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Porter/Stout

Beer Chicken Étouffée

Beer Chicken Étouffée (pandemic pantry version)

This is what happens when I can’t decide if going to the grocery store is worth it. I wanted to make this with crawfish, but as you can assume, that’s not exactly a pantry staple in Seattle. Then I did the thing where I debated with myself if it was worth going to the store to try to find what I wanted. 

But as we’ve already discussed, I can be kinda lazy, but I’m good at tricking myself into thinking I’m not. So I didn’t go to the store because "social distancing", and "public safety", blah blah. But really, it was because I got lazy and pants seemed like a hurdle I didn’t want to tackle. 

I did have chicken, so that was what I used, and it was amazing. This is authentic cooking, it’s pandemic cooking, it’s "use what you have to make something delicious" cooking. Which, honestly, was a bad thing because all it did was reinforce my laziness. I lazied and it worked for me, which makes me far more likely to do it that next time. Let’s hope all future lazy decisions yield something as delicious as this beer chicken etouffée. 

Beer Chicken Étouffée

Servings 6 servings

Ingredients
  

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 6 tablespoons (85g) unsalted butter
  • ½ cup (60g) flour
  • ½ of one yellow onion chopped
  • 2 ribs celery chopped
  • 1 large carrot chopped
  • 1 bell pepper chopped (any color)
  • 3 lbs chicken cut into cubes
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 4 cloves garlic grated with a microplane
  • 1 cup (8oz) stout
  • 2 cups (16oz) low sodium chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons hot sauce
  • 1 tablespoon creole seasoning
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
  • 1 tablespoon molasses not blackstrap
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • Rice for serving
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley

Instructions
 

  • Add the olive oil and butter to a large pan over medium heat until the butter is melted. Sprinkle with flour. Whisk over medium heat until the roux is the color of milk chocolate, about 15 minutes.
  • Add the onion, celery, carrot, and bell pepper, cook until the vegetables have softened.
  • Sprinkle the chicken on all sides with salt.
  • Add the chicken to the pan, cooking until browned.
  • Stir in the garlic.
  • Add the beer, scraping to deglaze the pan.
  • Add the broth, hot sauce, creole seasoning, Worcestershire sauce, molasses, and black pepper. Simmer until the sauce has thickened.
  • Add desired amount of rice to bowls, spoon the chicken over the rice, sprinkle with parsley.

Notes

Blackstrap molasses is what happens when you boil cane juice three times, removing nearly all the sugar resulting in a black, bitter sludge. Dark, light or unsulphured are all fairly interchangeable and pleasantly sweet. Make sure never to use Blackstrap when a recipe calls for molasses unless it’s specifically called for.

Puff Pastry Churro Curls with Chocolate Stout Dipping Sauce

Puff Pastry Churro Curls with Chocolate Stout Dipping Sauce

I’ve been taking stock quite a bit lately, haven’t you? What’s in the pantry (how did I get pickled raisins and why do I still have them?), what’s in my life (so many good people), what I’m grateful for (lots and lots). 

This helps, I promise. It helps you make dinner, helps you get out of bed, helps you to stay present. These are all things we need right now. In a previous life, I was a social worker for gang kids in South Central Los Angeles, and I actually have a Masters Degree in Psychology. Which totally helps me cook with beer, obviously. 

But I will tell you this, when anxiety starts to creep up on you, the simplest way to keep it at bay is to sit in the moment. "I’m ok, right now, I’m fine".  Take a deep breath, focus on what’s in the room around you. For me, cooking and baking help. It helps me to stay focused on the task at hand, and gives me something to look forward to, even if that’s just fake churros. 

If you can pay your bills, feed your family, and if that family is healthy, you are really, really fortunate. It’s ok to be a mess right now, that’s normal. Let yourself feel it for a second, then pull yourself back and remember that you’re ok, and you’re doing pretty damn good. Then make yourself some puff pastry churros because you’ve earned it. 

Puff Pastry Churro Curls with Chocolate Stout Dipping Sauce

Servings 12 curls

Ingredients
  

For the puff pastry:

  • 2 cups 240g flour
  • 1 ¼ cup 285g very cold butter cut into cubes
  • ½ teaspoon 3g salt
  • ½ cup 4oz very cold beer (pale ale, pilsner, pale lager)

For the pinwheels:

  • 1 tablespoon cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoons butter melted
  • 1 tablespoons beer

For the chocolate sauce:

  • 1/3 cup 2oz chocolate chips
  • 2 tablespoons stout beer
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream

Instructions
 

  • Add the flour, salt and approximately half of the butter to a food processor, pulse 10-15 times until just combined.
  • Add the remaining butter, pulse to combine (don’t over-process).
  • Add the flour mixture to a flat surface, make a well in the center, add the beer.
  • Mix with your hands until combined (this can also be done in a food processor, just make sure not to over mix or the dough will turn out tough).
  • Add to a lightly floured surface, roll into a rectangle about ½ inch thick. Fold into thirds, like a letter about to go into an envelope.
  • Roll again, then fold again. Repeat the process 3-4 times (this is how you get the layers).
  • Wrap in plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours (can be made several days in advance).
  • Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  • In a small bowl stir together the brown sugar, white sugar, cinnamon, and salt, set aside.
  • Roll the puff pastry into a rectangle on a lightly floured surface.
  • Add the melted butter and beer together (warm again if the beer makes the butter seize a bit) then brush the rectangle with the mixture.
  • Sprinkle liberally with a little less than half of the cinnamon-sugar mixture, reserve the remaining mixture.
  • Starting on the long end, roll the puff pastry into a tight log. Slice into 1-inch slices.
  • Add the slices, cut side up, to a baking sheet covered with a sheet of parchment, press down to flatten the slices.
  • Brush slices with the beer mixture.
  • and then sprinkle with a little of the sugar mixture (reserve the remaining cinnamon-sugar mixture).
  • Bake for 18-20 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool enough to handle.
  • One at a time press curl into the remaining cinnamon-sugar mixture to coat.
  • Add the ingredients for the chocolate sauce to a microwave-safe bowl. Heat for 30 seconds, stir and repeat until well combined.
  • Serve the churro curls alongside the chocolate mixture.

Chocolate Stout Brownie Bread

Chocolate Stout Brownie Bread, one bowl and just a few minutes!

I’ve been inundation you with posts lately, please give me a pass. You’re my therapy, truly. Cooking you things, and baking you a loaf cake that I call "bread" because it doesn’t sound as bad calling it a cake, is the way I’m coping with all of this. 

I’m sitting here in Seattle, the hotbed of uncertainty, and all I can think about is keeping busy while not leaving my house. So this equals cooking and baking. Baking all the things, and spoiling myself with a beerified-chocolate cake that’s masquerading as bread. 

 

But this is what we have to do. We have to spoil ourselves and those sheltered in place with us with things we wouldn’t normally let ourselves indulge in. Everything is suspended: events, concerts, office life, diets, low self-esteem. 

Indulging in chocolate is not suspended, it’s back on the air and bigger than ever. This bread-not-cake-I-swear is super easy, it takes about 5 minutes to get it into your oven and about an hour to get it into your face. And you have earned yourself a loaf of this stuff, and you are not allowed to feel guilty about it because that has been suspended, too. 

Chocolate Stout Brownie Bread

4.67 from 3 votes

Ingredients
  

  • 2 ½ cups (300g) all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup (50g) cocoa powder
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ¾ cup (150g) sugar
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • ½ cup (120g) full-fat sour cream
  • ¼ cup (60g) vegetable oil
  • ¾ cup (6oz) stout beer
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate chips

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F.
  • Add the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, baking powder, cornstarch, salt and sugar to a bowl, stir to combine. Add the eggs, vanilla, sour cream, vegetable oil, beer, and chocolate chips. Stir to combine.
  • Pour into an 8 ½ x 4 ½ inch loaf pan.
  • Bake until the top has puffed and is hard, about 40-50 minutes.
  • Remove from oven, allow to cool to room temperature. Cut into slices to serve.

Hoisin Pineapple Beer Pork over Coconut Lime Rice

Hoisin Pineapple Beer Pork over Coconut Lime Rice

How are you out there? Are you ok?

If you’re like me, and I kind of think you are, you have two opposite feelings, nearly back to back, and it’s unsettling. 

My thoughts jump from "Everyone needs to settle down, you are all overreacting!" to "Are we all going to die and is our society going to collapse and I need to form a post-apocalypse tribe immediately," 

and 

"Self-quarantine is great, and my neighbors are the best and I want to stay like this forever," and then the next minute: "Will I ever travel again, I need to be on a virus-free plane immediately or I’ll die because my wanderlust is killing me, and I need my local bars and restaurants to re-open soon, I miss them so much,"

It’s all so disorienting. Just know that you’re not alone, we are all in this together even if it feels lonely. 

My favorite part of pre-apocalypse grocery shopping is the "weird" ingredients are always left. The chicken breast and pork chops are long gone but the more obscure meat is in abundance and on sale. My particular grocery store had rows and rows of oxtails, shanks, and boneless pork ribs, and I’m hoping yours does too. So I made you something. It’s easy and since you’ll be home all day, you should make it. It’s really good and you’ll only want coconut rice from now on, so make sure to add cans and cans of coconut milk to your next venture out in your hazmat suit. 

Hoisin Pineapple Beer Pork over Coconut Lime Rice

5 from 4 votes

Ingredients
  

For the pork:

  • 3 lbs boneless country pork ribs or pork shoulder cut into chunks
  • 1 tablespoon salt kosher
  • 4 cloves of garlic
  • ¼ cup (62g) low sodium soy sauce
  • ¼ cup (66g) hoisin sauce
  • 2 teaspoons (10g) sriracha
  • 2 tablespoons (25g) brown sugar
  • 2 cup (310g) pineapple chunks drained if using canned
  • 1 cup (8oz) beer stout, porter, brown ale

For the rice:

  • 1 (14oz) can full-fat coconut milk
  • 1 ¼ cup (10oz) water
  • 1 ½ cups long-grain or jasmine rice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 3 tablespoons green onion chopped

Instructions
 

To make the pork:

  • Preheat the oven to 300°F.
  • Sprinkle the pork on all sides with salt, add to a large Dutch oven or covered baking dish.
  • Add the remaining ingredients (from the pork list) to a blender, blend on high until well combined. Pour the liquid over the pork. Cover and bake for one hour.
  • Remove the lid, turn the pork over, then continue to bake, uncovered, for 2 ½ more hours, turning the pork every 30 minutes or so until the pork is fork-tender (total of 3 1/2 hours of cooking time). 
  • Remove the pork from the pot, set aside.
  • Place the pot over a burner over high heat (if you used a baking dish, transfer the remaining liquid to a pot), boil, stirring frequently, until thickened.
  • Pour the thickened glaze over the pork.

To make the rice:

  • Add the coconut milk, water, rice, and salt to a large pot, stirring to combine.
  • Add to a burner over medium-high heat, bring to a boil, cover and reduce heat to low for 18 minutes. Once the 18 minutes is up, remove from heat but allow to sit for 2 minutes.
  • Remove the lid and stir in the lime juice and green onions.
  • Serve the pork over the rice.

Bulgogi Portobello Mushroom Wraps with Pickled Mint Slaw

Bulgogi Portobello Mushroom Wraps with Pickled Mint Slaw

There are days when I feel this is my only useful skill. Feed people. Make food. Cook and bake. So, that’s what I’ll do. I don’t have anything else to offer right now, but I can make you some food that tastes good, a small distraction and something to look forward to. 

It’s like practical self-care, food that you want to eat, want to serve to people. Something to plan for that you know won’t get canceled. Even if that plan is just dinner and a beer with the person you’re quarantined with. It’s time to take joy in small things, and do what you can to spread it around. It’s the good kind of contagious. 

Bulgogi Portobello Mushroom Wraps with Pickled Mint Slaw

Ingredients
  

For the mushrooms:

  • ½ cup (129g) low-sodium soy sauce (regular soy sauce will be too salty)
  • 1/4 cup (57g) stout beer
  • 3 tablespoons (42g) brown sugar
  • 5 garlic cloves grated with a Microplane
  • 2 tablespoons ginger grated with a Microplane
  • 3 tablespoons (46g) rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoon (30g) toasted sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon gochujang Korean hot sauce
  • 1 lbs portobello mushrooms thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil

For the slaw:

  • 2 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 cup (8oz) hot water
  • 1 teaspoon whole cloves
  • 1 tablespoon black peppercorns
  • 1 cup (8oz) apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup shredded cabbage
  • ¼ a large red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped mint
  • 2 tablespoon chopped cilantro
  • 2 green onions chopped

For the wraps:

  • 1 head butter lettuce cleaned, leaves removed
  • Thinly sliced chilies optional

Instructions
 

  • Add the soy sauce, beer, brown sugar, garlic, ginger, vinegar, sesame oil and gochujang to a bowl, mix until well combined.
  • Add the mushrooms to a large Ziplock bag, add the mixture on top, remove all the air. Add to the fridge, marinate for one hour and up to overnight.
  • Add the sugar, salt, hot water, cloves and peppercorn to a large bowl. Stir until the sugar and salt are dissolved. Add the vinegar and allow to rest for 5 minutes, remove the cloves and peppercorns.
  • Add the cabbage, onion, mint, cilantro and green onion. Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour and up to several days.
  • Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat.
  • Add the mushrooms and marinade. Cook until the marinade has thickened, and the mushrooms have softened about 10 minutes.
  • Add the mushrooms to the lettuce leaves, top with slaw and chilies (if using). 

Guinness Corned Beef Tacos with Pickled Cabbage Slaw

Guinness Corned Beef Tacos with Pickled Cabbage Slaw Diageo Beer Company USA, sponsored this post. Partnerships with The Beeroness and outside companies only occur when the company’s products are ones I use and enjoy myself. All ideas, words, and opinions are my  own.

Every once in a while the stars align and a holiday falls on just the right day. Like when Halloween is on a Saturday or Cinco De Mayo is on Thirsty Thursday, it just clicks it up a notch. 

This year, Saint Patricks Day is on Taco Tuesday, which will obviously necessitate Irish Tacos. What are Irish Tacos, you say?! Great question. Corned Beef and beer tacos, of course. 

Guinness is the unofficial, official beer of Saint Patrick’s day so I teamed up with them to give a beered up corned beef taco to make all your Saint Patrick Taco Tuesday dreams come true. 

Guinness Corned Beef Tacos with Pickled Cabbage Slaw

5 from 1 vote
Servings 12 tacos

Ingredients
  

For the Corned Beef *

  • 4 lbs beef brisket
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons curing salt this will make the meat pink
  • 3 tablespoon whole allspice berries
  • 1 tablespoon whole cloves
  • 1 tablespoon ground ginger
  • 2 tablespoon mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoon whole peppercorns
  • 3 cups of water
  • 3 (12 ounces) bottles of Guinness Extra stout
  • 4 cups ice
  • 1 yellow onion quartered

Pickled slaw:

  • 2 cup red cabbage shredded
  • 2 cup savoy cabbage shredded
  • ½ red onion thinly sliced
  • 1/3 cup lemon juice
  • 2 cups apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 teaspoon whole cloves
  • 2 teaspoon black peppercorns

For the Tacos

  • 12 corn tortillas

Instructions
 

  • In a large pot or Dutch oven, add brown sugar, curing salt, kosher salt, allspice berries, cloves, ginger, mustard seeds, peppercorns, along with the water.
  • Cook on high just until the salt and sugar dissolve, remove from heat. Add 2 bottles of stout (reserve the last bottle for cooking) and  ice, stir until ice has melted and brine is cool.
  • Add the brisket, cover with a lid and refrigerate for 5 days and up to 10.
  • Remove from brine and rinse well. Discard the brine and clean the Dutch oven.
  • Place the brisket back in the cleaned pot, along with the onion, pour the remaining bottle of stout and then cover with cold water until the brisket is fully cover with about one inch of water above the beef.
  • Bring to a low boil, cover and reduce heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Simmer for 3 hours or until the meat is fork-tender. Move to a carving board, thinly slice against the grain.
  • While the brisket cooks, make the pickled slaw. In a saucepan over medium heat, add the lemon juice, vinegar, salt, sugar, ginger, allspice, cloves and peppercorns in a pot.
  •  Bring to simmer just until the salt and sugar dissolve, remove from heat. Allow to cool to room temperature. 
  • In a large bowl, add the cabbage and onion. Pour the cooled pickling liquid over the cabbage and onion, refrigerate for one hour and up to a week (this can be done well in advance).
  • Fill the tortillas with beef and top with pickled slaw.

Notes

To use a pre-cured corned beef, skip the curing step and go right to the cooking part in step 5 step.
You’ll only need one bottle of Guinness Extra Stout, an onion  from the list of ingredients in the “for the corned beef” section, plus a cured, uncooked, corned beef brisket. 

Beer Battered Kung Pao Cauliflower Tacos

Beer Battered Kung Pao Cauliflower Tacos

I like to taco things that shouldn’t be tacoed. Speaking of, "tacoed" is another one of those words that Autocorrect and I disagree on the validity of, like beerified and hangry. 

And while we are on the topic of things people will disagree with me on, I’m fairly certain there is more than one person who would disagree with my decision to put all the things into tortillas and call them tacos. These are not my people. 

You’re on my side with this, I’m pretty sure. Because if I put anything in a homemade tortilla, hand it to you with a beer, you’ll eat it. And you’ll let me call it a taco even if it’s fairly ridiculous to do so. "You made me a cake taco!" you would say, and eat it even if it’s pretty insane. That’s why you’re my people, nothing is off-limits when it comes to handheld dinners and beer. 

These tacos do happen to be my new favorite accidentally vegan meal so anyone against my tacoing kung pao cauliflower doesn’t get any. It’s harsh but necessary, we need to have some limits with those people anyway. 

My recipe for Homemade Beer Tortillas 

Beer Battered Kung Pao Cauliflower Tacos

5 from 1 vote
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients
  

For the cauliflower:

  • Canola oil for frying
  • 2 cups (240g) all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 12 ounces pale ale beer
  • 3 cups cauliflower florets stems removed

For the Kung Pao sauce:

  • 3 tablespoons (45g) rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons (34g) hoisin sauce
  • 1/4 cup (58g) porter or stout beer
  • 1 tablespoon (15g) balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon (15g) soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Asian sesame oil or sesame chili oil
  • ¼ teaspoon ginger grater with a Microplane
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 4-5 dried chili Arbol pods chopped (more chilies will make it hotter)

For the tacos:

  • 12 corn tortillas homemade, or La Tortilla Factory if store-bought
  • ¼ cup chopped green onions
  • 3 tablespoons nuts shelled peanuts, pistachios, or cashews

Instructions
 

  • Heat 4 inches of canola oil in a pot over medium-high heat. Clip a deep-fry thermometer on the side and bring oil to 350F, adjust heat to maintain this temperature.
  • In a large bowl whisk together the flour, salt, garlic powder, soda, black pepper, and cornstarch.
  • Stir the beer into the flour bowl, whisk until combined adding additional beer or flour until the batter is just slightly thinner than that of pancake batter.
  • Turn the oven to 175F. Place a wire rack over a baking sheet, add the baking sheet to the oven.
  • One at a time dip the florets into the batter until well coated, allow the excess to slip off back into the bowl, then add to the hot oil. Fry until golden brown on all sides, about 4 minutes, then transfer to the baking sheet in the oven to keep warm until all cauliflower is done.
  • Add all the sauce ingredients to a pot over high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally, until the sauce has thickened, about 3 minutes
  • Add the cauliflower to the tortillas, drizzle with sauce, sprinkle with green onions and nuts. Serve immediately.

Gochujang Stout BBQ Burger with Fried Shallots and Blistered Shishitos

 Gochujang Stout BBQ Burger with Fried Shallots and Blistered Shishitos

This is basically an amalgamation of my neurosis, it’s true. First came my full-blown obsession with Shishito peppers that turned in me making them for a dinner party, then for myself, eating all alone over the sink, THEN I had to make something for you because the world needs shishito peppers right now! But it doesn’t end there. 

From there the snow started falling into my life with a vengeance and my California blood started to panic since I’m basically a lizard on a rock and I need all the sun all the time, and this led me—no, FORCED me— to make burgers. I became what is the human equivalent of a labrador left alone too long chewing on the curtains and my cabin fever was convinced that summertime food was the only answer. And that means burgers, obviously. 

So basically, what I’m trying to say in my rambling way, is that this burger, THIS BURGER, is the indoor cooking cure to the wintertime blues that we all need in our lives right now. It’s true, make it and you will feel better. Or at least full, and that’s always better than hungry. 

Gochujang Stout BBQ Burger with Fried Shallots and Blistered Shishitos

5 from 2 votes
Servings 4 burgers

Ingredients
  

For the beef patty:

  • 1 lbs 80/20 ground chuck beef
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 teaspoons pepper
  • 3 tablespoons butter

For the Gochuchang BBQ:

  • cup (160 g) apple cider vinegar
  • ½ cup (4 oz) stout
  • ½ cup (100g) dark brown sugar, packed
  • 1/3 cup (98g) gochujang (Korean hot pepper paste)
  • 3 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • Salt and pepper to taste

For the Shallots:

  • 1 large shallot blub peeled and sliced into 1/8 inch slices (about 1/3 cup)
  • ¼ cup (30g) flour
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon pepper
  • Oil for frying

For the Shihitos:

  • ½ lbs shishito peppers
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • ½ teaspoon flakey sea salt

For the burgers:

  • 4 kaiser rolls split
  • 1 small bunch cilantro

Instructions
 

Prep the beef:

  • Form the beef into 4 equal-sized patties, wider than the bun (it will shrink as it cooks) and fairly thin. Add to a plate, refrigerate until very cold, about 1 hour (can be done up to 24 hours in advance).

Make the barbeque sauce:

  • Add all the barbeque sauce to a pan over medium heat. Simmer, stirring frequently, until thickened. Set aside.

Make the shallots:

  • Add the flour, salt and pepper to a small bowl, stir to combine. Add the sliced shallots, toss to coat. Remove with a fork, shaking off the excess flour.
  • Add about ½ inch of oil to a pan over medium heat until hot but not smoking. Add the shallots, reduce heat to medium, cooking on both sides until crispy, and browned, about 10 minutes (make sure the oil isn’t too hot or the shallots will burn). Remove from oil, allow to drain on a stack of paper towels.

Make the shishitos:

  • Heat the sesame oil in a large skillet until very hot. Add the shishitos, allowing to blister on one side before turning with tongs (be careful, the oil will pop), allow to drain on a stack of paper towels, sprinkle with salt while still hot.

Make the patty:

  • Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Salt and pepper the patties liberally on all sides. Add to the skillet, cook on both sides until the meat is medium-rare, about 3 minutes on each side.

Assemble the burgers:

  • Add the patty, top with barbecue sauce, shishitos, shallots and cilantro, serve immediately

Stout S’mores & Pretzel Fudge

Stout S’mores & Pretzel Fudge (no  gelatin, vegetarian safe!)

I know, I KNOW! This was supposed to get to you a week ago, but that’s what sort of month I’m having. I was all set to edit the photos and get this up and then this happened so I’ve been having a hard time adulting ever since. 

But I am offering my dog sitting services for free to anyone with a nice fuzzy creature that needs love in the greater Seattle area because I need to console myself with petting all the furry things. 

This is also when chocolate comes in handy, you should always have some on hand in case of an emotional emergency. It’s my current means of coping and all pet related tragedies. I also made another batch of these and only gave away about half of them to keep the rest for myself, I’m Ok with this level of selfishness at this current moment in time. 

And I only gave away one square of these Stout S’mores & Pretzel Fudge so I should probably work on my sharing before it’s too late and I’m known as the person who hoards chocolate treats. It’s my New Year’s goal. 

Stout S’mores & Pretzel Fudge

5 from 1 vote
Servings 12 bars

Ingredients
  

Crust:

  • 4 full sheets graham crackers
  • 1 cup (65g) mini pretzel twists
  • 4 tablespoons (56g) melted butter

Fudge layer:

  • 16 wt oz dark chocolate 60% cocoa content
  • 1/3 cup (102g) sweetened condensed milk (not evaporated milk)
  • ¼ tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup (2oz) barrel-aged beer
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Marshmallow layer*:

  • 1 egg white
  • ½ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1/3 cup (66 g) plus 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons water or beer
  • 1/3 cup (110g) liquid agave (or light corn syrup)
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Instructions
 

Make the crust:

  • Preheat oven to 350°F.
  • Add the graham crackers and pretzels to a food processor, process until finely ground. Add the melted butter, process until well combined. Press into the bottom of a 9x13 pan (or use a 7x11 for thicker bars) until well compacted.
  • Bake for 12 minutes.

Make the fudge:

  • Add the chocolate, sweetened condensed milk, vanilla extract, beer and salt to the top of a double boiler (or a metal bowl set over a pot of gently simmering water).
  • Stir over medium-low heat (make sure the water does not boil) until most of the chocolate has melted. Remove from heat, continue to stir until all the chocolate has melted.
  • Pour over the crust, refrigerate until set, about 30 minutes.

Make the marshmallow layer:

  • Add the egg white and cream of tartar to a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, beat until light and foamy.
  • Add 1 tablespoon sugar and beat until stiff peaks form
  • In a saucepan, add the water (or beer), agave, and 1/3 cup sugar.
  • Cook over medium heat while stirring until the mixture reaches 248°F on a candy thermometer. This will take about 6-8 minutes.
  • Once the corn syrup mixture is ready, turn the mixer on medium and in a slow steady stream, pour the corn syrup mixture into the beaten egg whites.
  • Once all of the corn syrup mixture has been added, beat on high for 5 minutes until the mixture is stiff and glossy. 
  • Add vanilla extract and beat on high 1 minute.
  • Spread over the fudge in an even layer. Chill until ready to set, about 15 minutes.Brulee with top with a kitchen torch, or place under the broiler until browned. 
  • Cut into squares, chill until ready to serve.

Notes

Yes, you CAN use Marshmallow Fluff instead. But it needs to be kept refridgerated or it will slide all over the place. 

Beer and Brown Sugar Glazed Bacon Wrapped Dates

Beer and Brown Sugar Glazed Bacon Wrapped Dates

It turns out, you’re not alone. This week, according to the internet and science, is the most stressful week of the year. I feel it, it’s been an asshole of a week, do you feel it? I didn’t shower yesterday and I’m still in my pajamas. At NOON! This is the reality when you work at home. Actual real-life fact. 

Because of all of this, I needed an appetizer that is a never-fail type. A tried-and-true type. Bacon-wrapped dates it is. Goat cheese is my go-to when stuffing these suckers because I like the tang against the sweet and rich bacon-date combo. But you do you—any cheese will work (but some cheese is super melty and will ooze out, but that’s ok, it will still taste great). 

And I wanted to smother them in sugar and beer because sometimes I like to live vicariously through my food. Another actual fact. 

Thank GOD for beer mail because I didn’t even have to leave my house to get this gorgeous bottle of port barrel-aged Belgian quad from Barbarian Brewing which just so happened to pair perfectly with these little nuggets.  Beer makes things less stressful. 

Anyway, guys, I think I need to shower and eat my weight in bacon. Not sure if it will happen in that order. 

Beer and Brown Sugar Glazed Bacon Wrapped Dates

Ingredients
  

  • ½ cup (100g) brown sugar
  • ½ cup (4oz) beer brown ale, stout, porter, Belgian
  • 12 dates pitted
  • 1- ounce goat cheese
  • 6 slices of bacon

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven to 375°F.
  • Add the brown sugar and beer to a pot over high heat. Bring to a boil, boil until thickened and reduced, about 6 minutes.
  • Fill the dates with about 2 teaspoons of goat cheese each.
  • Cut the strips of bacon in half width-wise.
  • Wrap the dates with the bacon, add to a wire rack over a baking sheet, seam side down.
  • Brush the dates with the brown sugar mixture.
  • Bake until the bacon is crispy and dark, about 25-30 minutes (cooking time will depend on how thick your bacon is).

Balsamic Stout Short Ribs

Balsamic Stout Short Ribs, so rich and delicious! 

This is one of those unimpressive-very-impressive dishes. Sounds impressive, tastes impressive, but requires a very unimpressive amount of skill. Some things take skill, lots of it, years of it. Some things just take a long bath in the oven and they come out just right. Every time. In a forgiving sort of way that requires no pre-acquired meat knowledge. 

Short ribs are those things, short ribs are my friends because friends forgive, a lot. It’s really hard to screw up short ribs, just remember: long, slow, low. Not too low, and long is up to interpretation, but it’s a general rule. As long as you leave these suckers in the oven long enough (you can’t rush short ribs, but you can ignore them for hours) they will reward you with a meal that you can at least pretend you slaved over. People will believe you. 

Short ribs also really like it when you make them in advance and they get to have a nice little sleepover in your fridge. They’re that sort of friend. Give them a beer, let them spend the night, and they’ll make you look good the next day. It’s a great way to prepare for a dinner party that may or may not involve a human sleepover. Enough of these ribs and some beer and people won’t want to leave your house, so you should probably make up the guest room just in case. 

Balsamic Stout Short Ribs

5 from 1 vote

Ingredients
  

  • 3 lbs boneless beef short ribs
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • ½ cup (60g) flour
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large leek cleaned and sliced (white part only)
  • 1 rib celery diced
  • 2 large carrots diced
  • 6 cloves garlic minced
  • ½ cup (113g) balsamic vinegar
  • 1 (12oz) bottle stout beer
  • 2 cups (450g) beef broth
  • 1 (14.4 oz) can of fire-roasted diced tomatoes
  • 3 tablespoons (48g) tomato puree
  • Rice polenta or pasta for serving
  • chopped parsley

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven to 325°F.
  • Sprinkle the ribs with salt on all sides. Dredge in flour until well coated.
  • Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven or braiser over medium-high heat. Add the ribs, browning on all sides, remove and set aside.
  • Add the leeks, celery, and carrots, lower the heat to medium. Cook until the vegetables have started to caramelize, about 20 minutes. Stir in the garlic.
  • Add the balsamic, beer, and broth, scraping to deglaze the bottom of the pan.
  • Add the ribs back in, along with the tomatoes and tomato puree.
  • Cover and add to the oven for 2 hours, stirring occasionally.
  • After 2 hours, remove the lid and continue to cook until fork-tender, about 1 additional hour.
  • Remove the ribs, set aside.
  • Add the remaining liquid and vegetables to a blender, blend on high until well combined.
  • Plate the ribs, drizzle with sauce, sprinkle with chopped parsley.

Chocolate Stout Cookies with Salted Dulce De Leche Filling (pressure cooker or stove top)

Chocolate Stout Cookies with Salted Dulce De Leche Filling (pressure cooker or stovetop) the filling is TOO easy to make it’s almost not fair! 

Don’t make these. Seriously, turn back now while you still can!! Because once you make them and realize how easy it is to make SALTED Dulce de Leche sandwiched between two fudgy-but-crispy-and-chewy ridiculously good cookies you will be ruined. RUINED for all other cookies. You will never forget them and they will haunt your days and nights. 

Why are you still here?! I told you to turn back. But, I know you. You’re like me and the second someone tells you not to do a thing, you want to do the thing even more. So you’re going to do the thing. These cookies are the thing. Fine. There is nothing I can do. 

BUT I will make a suggestion because it’s what I’m going to do. You should buy a bunch of those Weck jars we love so much and make that Dulce de Leche in large batches and give it out as Christmas gifts as an excuse to make this filling again and lick all the spoons. 

 

Chocolate Stout Cookies with Salted Dulce De Leche Filling

4.41 from 5 votes

Ingredients
  

Filling:

  • 1 (14oz) can sweetened condensed milk
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt I used Maldon
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract

Cookies:

  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 lbs (about 4 cups) powdered sugar
  • 1 scant cup (105g) unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 teaspoons (5g) vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons stout beer

Instructions
 

Make the Dulce de Leche

  • Pressure cooker method: Remove the top of the can of sweetened condensed milk. Cover with aluminum foil.
  • Add the cooking rack to the bottom of a pressure cooker or Instant Pot. Add the prepared can. Pour water in the pressure cooker until about halfway up the side of the can. (for stovetop method, see note*)
  • Cover tightly, making sure the steam vent is closed.
  • Cook on high for 60 minutes. Allow the steam to vent naturally. Once the can has cooled, remove from the pressure cooker. 
  • Stir in the vanilla and salt, refrigerate until ready to use.

Make the Cookies

  • Preheat the oven to 375° F.
  • Separate the eggs. Add the salt to the whites and beat the whites until light and frothy.
  • While beating the whites add ½ cup powdered sugar to the whites a little at a time, beat until firm, as if making meringue.**
  • Add the remaining powdered sugar and cocoa powder, stir until combined.
  • Stir in the vanilla, beer, and egg yolks until well combined.
  • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Use a cookie scoop to mound cookies onto the parchment.
  • Bake for 14 minutes. Pull the parchment onto the counter to allow the cookies to cool.
  • Spread the filling between two cookies. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Notes

*To make Dulce de Leche on the stovetop, peel the label off the can but do not open. Add the can to a large pot of water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer checking every 30-minutes that the water is still above the can, adding more when it gets low. Simmer for 3 hours. Remove can with tongs or slotted spoon, allow to cool to room temperature (contents are are under pressure, do not open until cooled). Or you can add the cans to a slow cooker, cover with water and cook on low for 8 hours, allow to cool naturally before opening. Continue with step 5.
**It is essential to whip the egg whites until firm. If not, the cookies will have too much moisture and spread. If you aren't sure if you have whipped them enough, just freeze the cookies for 15 minutes prior to baking (after you have scooped them into balls), and bake for 16 minutes. 

Stout Chocolate and Vanilla Beer Cream Pie with Rum Whipped Cream

Stout Chocolate and Vanilla Beer Cream Pie with Rum Whipped Cream

Friends, you need to make a decision. Let’s say you’re on a deserted (dessert-ed?) island and you can only have one pie, what would it be? Don’t get too caught up with that fact that you’re on an island you don’t NEED pie, you need matches and a hatchet and shelter, just go with it. It’s a pie island and you can have as much pie as you want. But only one kind, what do you pick?

At first, I might think of apple pie, it’s a classic and I love it. Or cherry? I love cherry.  But if it’s one and only forever, I’d probably settle on chocolate after much hesitation and deliberation with the pie island procurement staff becoming irritated with me. BECAUSE IT’S CHOCOLATE. 

So I decided that for the holidays I must make a chocolate pie, and it must be made with beer, and this beer was outstanding. Luckily for me, I have a few of these Odell Brewing Barreled Treasure stouts left and they will most certainly be saved for holiday dessert service. Where I will serve several pies and you don’t have to choose just one. You can be the guy who has three slices of pie at once, as long as you have them with this beer. 

 

Also, it needs to be said that adding hazelnuts to my chocolate graham cracker crust is the best decision I’ve made all year. 

Stout Chocolate and Vanilla Beer Cream Pie with Rum Whipped Cream

Ingredients
  

Crust:

  • 9 full sheets chocolate graham crackers
  • ¼ cup (30g) roasted hazelnuts
  • 2 tablespoon (30g) brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons (45g) melted butter

Chocolate layer:

  • 10 oz dark chocolate 60% cacao
  • ½ cup (120g) heavy cream
  • 1/3 cup (78g) stout beer

Vanilla Cream Layer:

  • 1 ¼ cup 300g of heavy cream
  • ½ cup (118g) beer (pilsner, lager, pale ale)
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 1 cup (200g) of sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Whipped Cream Layer

  • 1 (240g) cup heavy cream
  • ¼ (30g) cup powdered sugar
  • 2 oz spiced rum

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 325°F.
  • Add the graham crackers, brown sugar, and hazelnuts to a food processor, process until well combined. While the food processor is running, add the melted butter, process until combined.
  • Starting with the sides press well into the bottom of a 9-inch springform or pie pan. Press well using the bottom of a heavy glass or measuring cup.
  • Add all the ingredients for the chocolate layer into a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on high for 30 seconds, stir and repeat until melted and combined (alternately, this can be done in the top of a double boiler).
  • Pour into the crust in an even layer. Refrigerate until set, about 15 minutes.
  • Make the vanilla layer: Add the cream, beer, and vanilla to a pot over medium heat. Heat until bubbles start to form at the edges and just starting to simmer.
  • In a large bowl whisk together the egg yolks, sugar, and salt until well combined. While whisking, slowly add the cream mixture until well combined with the yolks (don’t add the hot cream too quickly or it will turn into scrambled eggs).
  • Add the mixture back into the pot, bring to a simmer, stirring constantly until thickened, about 10 minutes.
  • Pour over the chocolate layer in an even layer. Bake at 325°F for 35 minutes or until the edges have started to puff, the pie will still be very jiggly. Refrigerate until set, at least 3 hours. Pie is best made the day before.
  • Add all the whipped cream ingredients to the bowl of a stand mixer, mix on high until soft peaks form, add to the pie in an even layer. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Stout Creole Gumbo over Smokey Cheddar Grits

Stout Creole Gumbo over Smokey Cheddar Grits

This is something you need to be warned about. At least I did and I think we are alike, you and I. When I first started to dive into trying to figure out this food and cooking thing I didn’t know how important some things were, because not everything is important. Sometimes you can make swaps, skip steps, make it your own, and it’s still delicious. And then sometimes you ignore the "soften the butter" step and your chocolate frosting looks like ground beef and you have no idea what happened. 

I’m going to ask you, no, BEG you to cook your flour for a long time and you’ll look at me like I’m a crazy person. It’s just flour! How important can that be?! I’ll just do it for like 3 minutes, it’ll be fine, right?! 

I know, I hear you, it doesn’t seem that important. BUT IT IS. Have you ever seen a sad, anemic looking gumbo with a light brown sauce? Back away, don’t eat it. It’s not very good. And it’s because the person who made it skipped that step. It’s ok, they were probably having a bad day, we forgive them.  But not your gumbo, your gumbo is dark and gorgeous and delicious. Because you didn’t skip that step. You opened your beer early, drank it and just enjoyed a little moment to yourself. I promise you, it’s worth it. 

Especially if the beer you opened was this one:

I spend some of my childhood years in San Luis Obispo, California. If you’ve never driven Highway 1 south from San Franciso, ending in San Luis Obispo to stay the night at The Madonna Inn, you now have a new item to add to your travel checklist. I’ve been all over the world and I promise you, it’s one of the best road trips that exist in the Universe.  Once you do, you must reward yourself with a beer at Firestone Walker. The beer doesn’t just have a place in my heart because of where it’s grown, it’s absolutely some of the most amazing and consistent beer there is.

Craft beer can be squirrely, and making batch after batch of the same beer, making sure each batch taste the same as the last, is nearly impossible. But I have yet to try any Firestone Walker beer that isn’t exactly what I want it to be. It’s consistent, and consistently incredible. 

Coconut Merlin is a beer you should try, it’s fantastic. If you can’t get it where you live, then I guess you just have to do that road trip I suggested. Don’t worry, there is beer at the end. And it’s really good. 

Stout Creole Gumbo over Smokey Cheddar Grits

5 from 1 vote
Servings 6 servings

Ingredients
  

For the Gumbo:

  • 1 lbs bacon chopped
  • 1 green bell pepper diced
  • 1 cup white onions diced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/3 cup flour
  • ½ cup stout beer
  • 4 cups seafood or fish broth
  • ½ lbs okra sliced
  • 2 (14.5oz) cans fire-roasted diced tomatoes
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 tablespoon gumbo file
  • 1 lbs andouille sausage cut into ½ inch rings
  • 1 lbs raw shrimp
  • 1 lbs live clams
  • Chopped parsley

For the Grits:

  • 3 ½ cups chicken broth
  • ¼ cup half and half
  • 1 cup corn grits
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • ½ cup shredded cheddar cheese use smoked cheddar for a more intense smoke flavor

Instructions
 

Make the gumbo:

  • Add the bacon to a large stockpot or braiser over medium heat. When the bacon starts to render add the onions and peppers, cooking until the onions have softened and the bacon has rendered all of it’s fat.
  • With a slotted spoon remove the bacon and vegetables, setting aside. You want about 1/3 cup of bacon fat still in the pan (no need to meticulously measure, just eyeball it), if there is significantly more than 1/3 cup discard excess, if there is less add the olive oil to the bacon fat. Sprinkle with flour. 
  • Cook the flour, stirring frequently over medium heat, until the roux is dark brown. This will take at least 20 minutes and up to 40 minutes, it’s the backbone of the dishes’ flavor so don’t skip it.
  • Once the roux is a dark brown add the beer, scraping to deglaze the bottom of the pan.
  • Add the broth, tomatoes, okra, bacon and vegetables, Cajun seasoning, cayenne, file, and sausage. Simmer until slightly thickened, about 10 minutes.
  • Add the shrimp and clams, stir slightly and then cover immediately. Allow to simmer for 5 minutes. Lift the lid, discard any clams that did not open. Sprinkle with parsley before serving.

Make the grits:

  • Add the broth and half and half to a saucepan, bring to a boil then reduce to a low simmer.
  • Add the grits, salt, and smoked paprika, cover with a lid. Simmer, stirring occasionally until the grits have softened, about 25 minutes. Stir in the cheese.
  • Serve the polenta topped with gumbo.

Notes

If you want to make this in advance, stop right before adding the shrimp and clams. The dish without the seafood can simmer over low heat for hours without issue, but it will make the seafood tough. Add the seafood, cooking right before serving. You can also make and refrigerate it without the seafood and then add it back to the pot, bring to a simmer and then cook the seafood before serving. 
Don't store live clams in water or in airtight packaging. Store them in an open container between wet paper towels. Ideally, buy them right before using. 

Chocolate Porter Pecan Bars with Beer Candied Bacon

Chocolate Porter Pecan Bars with Beer Candied Bacon

Chocolate Porter Pecan Bars with Beer Candied Bacon

I know, I KNOW! Don’t look at me like that. I know that even though I’m in the midst of promoting my new cookbook Lush, I give to you a bacon dessert recipe. Is that because I want to make all the people happy, you ask? No, it’s more likely because I want to anger and upset all the people or possibly because I’ve never had a very good relationship with rules and expectations. Either way, I do apologize. 

But this is also to say that just because I am the type of person who likes to put candied bacon on desserts this does NOT preclude me from also being the type of person who also loves to make food with plants, plants are delicious. Beer is made of plants. So that makes it salad, and it’s healthy (don’t take nutrition advice from me, it’s ill-advised). 

This is also to say that my book Lush is the type of book that you will love if the idea of putting bacon on dessert horrifies you, and also if it intrigues you. It’s a book for people who love delicious food and beer, but it is minus bacon. I hope you love it as much as I do. 

Chocolate Porter Pecan Bars with Beer Candied Bacon

Servings 24 BARS

Ingredients
  

Bacon:

  • 4 strips thick sliced bacon
  • 3 tablespoons (38g) brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon (12g) barrel aged stout or porter

Crust:

  • 2 cups (240g) all purpose flour
  • 2/3 cup (70g) powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon (6g) salt
  • 13 tablespoons (186g) unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 1 teaspoon (6g) vanilla extract

Filling:

  • 3 large eggs
  • ¾ cup (180g) light corn syrup
  • ½ cup (100g) brown sugar, packed
  • ¼ cup (2oz) barrel aged stout or porter
  • 2 tablespoons (10g) cocoa powder
  • 1 teaspoon (6g) vanilla extract
  • 6 ounces high-quality dark chocolate chopped
  • 1 cup (120g) unsalted pecans, coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon (6g) salt
  • Flakey sea salt for topping

Instructions
 

  • Preheat the oven to 375°F.
  • Add the bacon to a wire rack over a baking sheet.
  • Stir together the brown sugar and the beer. Brush the top side of the bacon liberally with the mixture. Bake for 8 minutes. Flip the bacon, then brush with the mixture. Bake for an additional ten minutes. Remove from oven, remove the bacon and allow to cool on a cutting board. Once the bacon is cooled, chop the bacon, set aside.
  • Lower the oven temperature to 350°F. Add the flour, powdered sugar, and salt to a food processor, pulse to combine.
  • Add the butter and vanilla extract, process until well combined.
  • Line an 9x13 baking dish with parchment paper. Press the crust into the bottom of the pan in an even layer.
  • Bake at 350 for 15 minutes or until just starting to turn a light golden brown. Allow to cool for 10 minutes (allowing the crust to cool will help it to stay in two distinct layers from the filling).
  • Add all the filling ingredients (except the flakey sea salt) to a mixing bowl, beat until well combined. Pour over the cooled crust.
  • Sprinkle the chopped bacon on top, then sprinkle with the flakey sea salt ( I used smoked Maldon sea salt).
  • Bake at 350°F for 35 minutes or until the filling has set and no longer jiggles when you shake the rack. Remove from oven, allow to cool before cutting.

Beer Chicken Satay with Almond Stout Dipping Sauce

Beer Chicken Satay with Almond Stout Dipping Sauce

I have recently discovered, to my abject horror, that I vastly prefer almond butter to peanut butter. Why so horrified, you ask? Because it is, in my conservative estimation, about one thousand times more expensive. And I am cheap. Have I told you this? That I have not one, but three favorite thrift stores, each one has it’s own unique category of items I prefer it for (food props, random vintage furniture, weird but fun jewelry). This is a true fact. 

Then there comes along these items that overpower my will to conserve. Like $30 bottles of beer, and jars of roasty nut butter. No, no, that $13 dollar jar of almond butter makes total sense! And then I eat it and I’m convinced, money can be saved elsewhere because I can’t go back, not now. It’s so much better!

Sure, some people will DIE if they eat peanuts and that’s a fine reason to forgo the eating of such nuts. But there is also the added benefit of superior taste and texture, so it’s a win/win. From now on, all satay sauce should just be made with almonds, it’s safer. And more delicious.

Go forth and eat your almonds with a fine roasty stout and chicken hot off the grill. 

 

Beer Chicken Satay with Almond Stout Dipping Sauce

5 from 2 votes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients
  

Chicken Skewers:

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 garlic cloves grated with microplane
  • 1 cup 8 oz full-fat coconut milk from a well shaken can
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • ¼ teaspoon fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame chili oil
  • 1 lbs chicken thighs cut into cubes
  • ½ cup beer (pilsner, pale ale, lager)

Satay sauce:

  • ¼ cup 64g smooth almond butter
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame chili oil
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 1 teaspoon fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon coconut milk from a tin
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons stout beer

Instructions
 

  • Stir together all the chicken skewer ingredients (except the chicken), add the chicken. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour and up to 24.
  • Preheat the grill to medium high.
  • Thread the chicken through skewers. Add the chicken skewers to the grill, cooking on both sides until cooked through, about 5 minutes per side.
  • Stir together the satay sauce ingredients.
  • Serve the chicken alongside the satay sauce.

Beer and Doughnut Ice Cream

Beer and Doughnut Ice Cream

Look at you, you weirdo. Passing all those normal recipes for regular ice cream and coming to visit me and my left of center concoction that involves my two favorite foods. When you ask me what kind of cake I want for my birthday, the answer is no. I don’t want cake (ok, I do, I always want cake) but instead of cake, I’d much rather have a doughnut. Because it’s fried cake and that’s always better. You will of course also serve it to me with a beer because it’s my birthday, and you’re that kind of person. 

So here we are, eating our doughnuts and drinking our beer and we decide to next-level it, as we do. So we decide to make ice cream out of it. We also decide to sleep on it because a drunk idea and a sober idea aren’t always the same thing. The next day, after we wake up and decide that day-old doughnuts are not worth it, we decide that drunk us had a great idea. We also realize that making doughnut ice cream is the best use of day-old doughnuts anyway and we’re brilliant. So happy birthday to us, let’s make some ice cream. 

Beer & Doughnuts Ice Cream

Servings 6 servings

Ingredients
  

  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 classic glazed raised doughnut chopped
  • 1/3 cup stout
  • 4 egg yolks
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ½ cup powdered sugar
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Instructions
 

  • Add the milk, cream, chopped doughnut and beer to a pan over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring frequently until the milk starts to bubble around the edges and the doughnut has broken down. Remove from heat, allow to cool slightly.
  • Add the yolks to a mixing bowl with the granulated sugar, powdered sugar, vanilla, and salt. Stir until well combined.
  • Slowly add the milk mixture while whisking continuously.
  • Add to an airtight container. Refrigerate until chilled, about 3 hours. 
  • Add to an ice cream maker, churn according to manufactures specifications until a soft-serve consistency (in a KitchenAid ice cream maker, this takes about 15 minutes). 
  • Transfer to a freezer container, freeze until set, about 2 hours.

All-Purpose Beer Marinade for Grilling (meat or veggies!)

Diageo Beer Company USA, sponsored this post. Partnerships with The Beeroness and outside companies only occur when the company’s products are ones I use and enjoy myself. All ideas, words, and opinions are my  own.

The first brewery I ever visited was in Ireland when I was in college. I’d taken a flight to Dublin, landing blurry-eyed and confused early on a Thursday morning. As I stood outside the airport, my heavy pack weighing down my small frame, I tried to form enough of a thought to figure out which way to walk to get to my hostel. A passerby stops in front of me. An older man, a few inches shorter than me, clad in a wool cardigan over a plaid button-down, his eyes even bluer than mine asks me if I’m lost. I tell him that I think my hostel is just down the road but I’m not sure which way to walk. When he asks for the name of the place I’m staying, I tell him it’s called The Brewery hostile and it’s right next to the Guinness brewery.

His eyes light up, “I’ll take you there! Any excuse for a good pint!” He walks me to my destination and pauses only briefly before making his way to that taproom for a pint. The next day, I followed suit. It was the first time I’d ever heard a brewer talk, and the closest I’d ever been to brewing equipment. It left a mark.

I left that trip with two souvenirs that have stayed with me: how proud the Irish are of the Guinness brand and its history, and the love that brewers have for their craft. I’d learned that Guinness signed a 9,000-year lease on the space they still occupy, that they were one of the first companies in the world to offer employee benefits (some people even credit them with starting the trend), and one of my favorite beer facts ever:

Since the 1960’s the Queen gives out an award every year for technological achievement. In 1991 this award was given to the Guinness nitro widget (that tiny ping pong sized ball in the cans of Guinness that make them taste like draft). What came in #2 to the Nitro widget? The internet. THIS is how adored Guinness is, and that love is infectious.

To this day, I still drink Extra Stout. It’s a great beer, smooth and mellow, and it’s perfect for cooking. This summer is just kicking off and I’m not slowing down on my consumption of Guinness any time soon, it’s smooth and mellow enough for even hot weather and it’s the perfect beer to use when marinating meat or veggies for the grill.

All-Purpose Beer Marinade for Grilling (meat or veggies!)

5 from 4 votes

Ingredients
  

  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ½ cup Guinness Extra Stout Beer
  • 3 cloves garlic grated with a microplane
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons onion powder
  • 2 teaspoons chili powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons salt

Instructions
 

  • Stir together all ingredients.
  • Add the meat, fish or vegetables to the marinade (gallon sized Ziploc bag works well).
  • Marinate for 2 to 12 hours.
  • Remove from marinade and grill as desired.