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Stout BBQ Meat Ball Sliders

Stout BBQ Meat Ball Sliders

Stout BBQ Meat Ball Sliders

"Do pigs…smell like bacon?'

I’m talking to a Hat Grabber at a party in Vegas. Hat Grabber is shorthand for a very young, very pretty, fairly vacant, girl who does things only she can do without getting punched in the face. This includes things like grabbing the hats of the heads of men she’s just met, putting it on her head, and forcing everyone to answer the question, "OH MY GOD, HOW CUTE DO I LOOK?" Hat grabbers.

I’m talking to a Hat Grabber about growing up on a farm, and she asks me if pigs smell like bacon.

"Live pigs? Do live pigs smell like bacon?" I’m a little confused and wonder if I actually heard her correctly.

"….yeah. I mean, I’ve always wondered that."

I’m mostly thinking about how quickly I can exit the conversation without hurting her feelings. "No," I answer, "They don’t smell that good. Also, cows don’t smell like hamburgers."

She laughs. She thinks I’m hilarious. I point to the waiter circulating the party with a silver tray of mini burgers. "How cute are those?! You should eat one!" She grabs her Hat Grabbing accomplice that has just returned from the bar and heads right for the cute food.

I’m relieved, I feel like I’ve been rescued. I owe the remainder of that evening to cute mini burgers. Burgers that actually do smell much more like bacon than live pigs do.

Stout BBQ Meat Ball Sliders -4

Stout & Sriracha Beer Barbecue Sauce Recipe 

Stout BBQ Meat Ball Sliders

Ingredients

  • 1 lb ground chuck
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ cup breadcrumbs
  • ¼ cup stout beer
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 1 batch (2 cups) Stout & Sriracha BBQ Sauce (link above)
  • 12 slider buns

Directions

  1. In a large bowl add the meat, garlic powder, onion powder, chili powder, salt, egg, bread crums, and beer. stir until just combined (about two of three turns with your hands). Over handling the meat will make it tough and mealy.
  2. Place bowl in the fridge for 1 hour and up to 1 day (this will help keep it’s shape during cooking.
  3. Using a cookie scoop, make balls just smaller than a golf ball with the chilled meat.
  4. Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium high heat until very hot. Add the meat balls, pull the skillet back and forth over the burner to roll the meat balls around in the pan. Cook until meatballs are just starting to brown, about 5 minutes. Reduce heat and add the barbeque sauce, cover with a lid, cooking at a simmer until meatballs are glazed and sauce is very thick.
  5. Place one to two meatballs inside slider buns. Serve warm.
https://domesticfits.com/stout-bbq-meat-ball-sliders/

Stout BBQ Meat Ball Sliders -1

Porter Braised Beef Short Ribs Sandwiches with Jalapeño Beer Cheese Sauce

Porter Braised Beef Short Ribs Sandwiches with Jalapeño Beer Cheese Sauce  #beer #recipe #tailgating   

Porter Braised Beef Short Ribs Sandwiches with Jalapeño Beer Cheese Sauce 2

On the way to making quick chicken tacos I decided to make a burger. One that takes a couple of hours, one that I decided to call a sandwich instead because I felt like it. One that I decided to spice up with jalapenos. Because things that take a few hours need to be made. There’s a feeling of accomplishment, of unguarded control, a way to push back against the restraint of the rest of your life, the parts that you can’t govern as you want.

But you deserve a little control, a little bit of your life that you have total say over. A little bit of something that goes right, and no one is pushing you around, or taking advantage of you, a space where your work doesn’t go unnoticed. No matter what great things you’ve done this week, and I know there have been plenty, you won’t be getting a parade. Or a Congratulations card. Or even a confetti shower when you walk in the door. But you should, because I’m sure you’ve done something to deserve those things. But with these, all that hard work won’t go unnoticed. You might not get a piñata and a present, but you will get some delicious sandwiches. Even though I’m sure you deserve much more.

 

Porter Braised Beef Short Ribs Sandwiches with Jalapeño Beer Cheese Sauce

 

Porter Braised Beef Short Ribs Sandwiches with Jalapeño Beer Cheese Sauce

Ingredients

    For the Short Ribs:
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 3 lbs bone in beef short ribs
  • 3 tbs flour
  • ½ tsp chili powder
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • 1 tbs brown sugar
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 1 ½ cups beef broth
  • 12 oz porter beer
  • For the Beer Cheese Sauce:
  • 2 tbs butter
  • 2 fresh jalapenos, diced
  • 2 tbs flour
  • 2 tbs cornstarch
  • 1 cup IPA beer
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • 2 cups (4 wt oz) shredded cheddar cheese
  • 8 sour dough rolls, split

Directions

  1. Sprinkle the salt on all sides of the short ribs. In a small bowl stir together the flour, chili powder, black pepper, garlic powder, cumin and brown sugar. Sprinkle the ribs on all sides with the flour mixture.
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large pot or Dutch oven. Add the short ribs, browning on all sides.
  3. Add the broth and beer, bring to a low simmer. Add the lid at a vent, cooking until short ribs are tender and falling off the bone, about 2 ½ hours, remove from heat. Using two forks, shred while still in the pot. Allow to sit in braising liquid for ten minutes, remove from braising liquid.
  4. In a pan over medium high heat, melt the butter. Add the jalapenos, cook until softened. Sprinkle with flour and cornstarch, whisk until well combined, allow to cook until a light brown color.
  5. Add the beer and the milk, bring to a low simmer. About ¼ cup at a time, whisk in the cheese, making sure all cheese is melted before adding more. Keep warm while you make the burgers (sauce will thicken as it cools, add additional milk or beer and add to heat if the sauce thickens too much).
  6. Add the ribs into rolls, top with cheese sauce. Serve warm.
https://domesticfits.com/porter-braised-beef-short-ribs-sandwiches-jalapeno-beer-cheese-sauce/

Porter Braised Beef Short Ribs Sandwiches with Jalapeño Beer Cheese Sauce3

 

 

 

Stout Mushroom Gravy and Chicken with Beer Biscuits

 

Stout Mushroom Gravy and Chicken with Beer Biscuits  

Stout Mushroom Gravy and Chicken with Beer Biscuits_

 

I was once friends with a man who was 100 years old. We had a bit of an unlikely friendship, since he had reached retirement age long before I was even born. He was smart, funny, and seems to have no concept of the age gap.

Life was a constant opportunity to make people laugh, and he took full advantage of it.

When he moved to Los Angeles in the 1940’s to get his pneumonia stricken daughters out of the frigid East Coast winters, he was without money, without a job, and without an education. He walked in to a Taxi company headquarters and asked for a job. He had a fantastic driving record and a winning smile, in his book, that’s the only resume he needed. As soon as the hiring manager found out that he had only lived on the West Coast of a week, knew nothing about Los Angeles freeways, and had never driven a cab, he shut down the interview.

“If you don’t know how to get from LAX to the Roosevelt Hotel, how are you going to get the client there??”

Jack responded with this famous smile, “Well if you don’t give me the cab, it’s gonna take a whole lot longer!”

He got the job.

Jack worked as a cab driver, running tourist from the Airport to Hollywood for over 30 years. He was also the very first Employee of the Month for the cab company, and to date, the recipient of the  most complimentary letters ever sent to the cab company about any one of their employees.

As I sat with him only a few months before his 101’s birthday, eating biscuits that his nurse had made us, I asked him if he had any regrets.

“Not really. The secret to living 100 years old and not regretting anything is this: Do your best. Don’t hurt anyone. Make friends with anyone who will let you.”

 When my job moved me farther from his apartment in the valley, I wasn’t able to visit as often as I used to so I wrote letters, postmarked from my Santa Monica office. One day I got a return letter, addressed to me with flowery handwriting. It was from his 76 year old daughter:
"Jackie,
I’m not sure what it was that formed a friendship between you and my Dad, but I wanted you to know how much he valued you. Your visits brightened his day, even his week. If there was a highlight from his last decade of life, it was the time he spent with you. He spoke of you often, and although my sister and I were at first skeptical of a friendship between him and a girl in her 20’s, it quickly became clear that there was a special bond between you two. I’m so sorry to tell you that he passed away, just a week shy of his 101’s birthday. I do want you to know that we appreciate the time you spent with him in his last year. Thank you."
I cried. And ate biscuits in his honor, his favorite breakfast. To this day, "Do your best. Don’t hurt anyone. Make friends with anyone who will let you” is some of best advice I’ve gotten.

Stout Mushroom Gravy and Chicken with Beer Biscuits 3

 

Stout Mushroom Gravy and Chicken with Beer Biscuits

Ingredients

    For the Biscuits:
  • 3 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 8 tbs unsalted cold butter, cut into cubes
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 2/3 cup Belgian ale (or wheat beer)
  • 2 tbs melted butter
  • ¼ tsp course sea salt
  • For the Chicken and Gravy:
  • 3 tbs butter
  • 2 boneless skinless chicken thighs
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • ¼ cup chopped yellow onion
  • 8 wt oz chopped crimini mushrooms
  • ¼ cup flour
  • 1 cup beef stock
  • ¾ cup stout beer
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • 1 tbs honey
  • salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. In a processor add flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and sugar.
  3. Pulse to combine. Add the cold butter, process until well combined. Add to a large bowl.
  4. Add the buttermilk and beer. Mix with a fork until just combined.
  5. Add to a well-floured flat surface, pat into a rectangle. Using a cold rolling pin (preferably marble) gently roll into a large rectangle, about 1 inch in thickness, using as few strokes as possible.
  6. Fold the dough into thirds as you would a letter about to go into an envelope. Roll lightly, once in each direction to about 1 inch thickness, fold in thirds again. Gently roll into about 1 1/2 inch thickness (this will give you the flakey layers).
  7. Using a biscuit cutter cut out 6 to 8 biscuits. Place in a baking pan that has been sprayed with cooking spray.
  8. Brush biscuits with melted butter, sprinkle salt.
  9. Bake at 425 for 10 to 12 minutes or until the tops are golden brown.
  10. While the biscuits bake, make the gravy.
  11. Melt the butter in a sauce pan over medium high heat.
  12. Sprinkle the chicken thighs with salt and pepper. Sear on each side until golden brown, remove from the pan, chop (they do not need to be cooked through).
  13. Add the onions, cook until softened, about five minutes. Add the mushrooms, cook until mushrooms are dark brown and soft.
  14. Sprinkle with flour, cook until the flour has turned brown, about 2 minutes.
  15. Add the beef stock and stout. Simmer until thickened. Add the chicken cubes back into the pan, simmer until cooked through.
  16. Add the cream, honey, stir until well combined.
  17. Salt and pepper to taste.
  18. Split the biscuits, fill with gravy.
https://domesticfits.com/stout-mushroom-gravy-chicken-beer-biscuits/

 

Stout Mushroom Gravy and Chicken with Beer Biscuits 2

Pretzel Crusted Chocolate Beer Fudge Cookies

Pretzel Crusted Chocolate Beer Fudge Cookies #beer #chocolate #cookies #pretzels #recipe

I’ve never really been the girl with the sweet tooth. I’ve had a meat tooth. A salt tooth. A beer tooth. I could eat my weight in guacamole or tater tots and it takes a small act of God to get me to stop eating sushi. But sweets don’t give me the mad rabid cravings that get me to lose my mind. I love chocolate, and pie and cake, and I’ll always eat dessert if it’s around. I’ll take a small slice of every single pie at the Thanksgiving table, but those late night cravings that come after a few IPA’s are almost always of the salty variety.

But every once in a while something will hit the right note. Like this toffee that I ate the entire batch of before I could share and then lied and said it fell on the ground when really it just fell into my mouth. The perfect combination of sweet and salty will get me every time. A little sea salt sprinkle on a danish before it’s baked, or salted caramel, or candied bacon, it’s hard for me to really fall in love with a dessert that doesn’t kick me some salt. Which is why pretzels seem to make it into my desserts more often than fruit does. Maybe you like this too, after all, chocolate and pretzels go perfectly with beer.

Pretzel Crusted Chocolate Beer Fudge Cookies #beer #chocolate #cookies #pretzels #recipe

Pretzel Crusted Chocolate Beer Fudge Cookies

Ingredients

  • 1 cup bread flour
  • ¼ cup cocoa powder
  • ½ tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp espresso powder
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 10 wt oz (about 1 ¾ cups, chopped) good quality dark chocolate (60% cocao)
  • 4 tbs unsalted butter (cut into cubes)
  • 2 tbs vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup black IPA (stout or porter will also work)
  • 1 large egg plus 1 yolk
  • 2 cups mini pretzels
  • 2 tbs golden brown sugar

Directions

  1. In a bowl add the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, salt, espresso powder, and sugar, mix until well combined. Set aside
  2. In a microwave safe bowl add the chocolate, the butter and the oil. Microwave on high for 30 seconds, stir and repeat until melted. Don't over heat or the chocolate will seize.
  3. Stir in the beer.
  4. Add the chocolate mixture, egg and yolk to the dry ingredients and stir until just combined, some lumps are OK.
  5. Cover and refrigerate until the dough as has set, about 1 hour and up to 36.
  6. Preheat oven to 350.
  7. Add the pretzels and brown sugar in a food processor. Process until pretzels are broken up but large pieces still remain.
  8. Using a cookie dough scoop, make balls just a bit smaller than golf balls, roll into shape with your hands. Place dough balls into pretzel mixture, press until pretzels are coated.
  9. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, add cookie balls
  10. Bake cookies at 350 for 8-10 minutes or until the edges have set but the center is still soft. Cookies will firm up as they cool. Don't over-bake or the cookies will be dry and crumbly.
https://domesticfits.com/pretzel-crusted-chocolate-beer-fudge-cookies/

Pretzel Crusted Chocolate Beer Fudge Cookies #beer #chocolate #cookies #pretzels #recipe

Honey Mustard Mushroom Stout Chicken

Honey Mustard Mushroom Stout Chicken: 30 minute, one pot chicken dinner.   

Honey Mustard Mushroom Stout Chicken: 30 minute, one pot chicken dinner.

A few years ago I was stuck in a small town in south Italy on a 22 hour layover.

While trying to figure out if sleeping in the tiny terminal was feasible, I met an Italian girl about my age. Her English was good, she was stunning, and she was about half way to earning her pilots license, I was instantly enamored with her. She asked if I’d like to stay with her for the night, in the small apartment she shared with her mom. I quickly agreed, jumping in a cab with her to head to a crowded part of town.

She’d planed to drag me around Pescara, first with her boyfriend, then later with a much older man she referred to as her lover, but before then we were obligated to sit down at a small dining table with her mom, who’d been cooking all afternoon.  After an incredible meal of homemade bread, a small green salad, smashed peas and a roasted chicken, I’d offered to do the dishes. Half way through the clean up, Chiara came into the small kitchen dressed in tight jeans, shiny black heels that made her well over 6 feet tall and tight, tiny tube top. She leaned against the counter as I finished drying the larger platter and asked me about my life in LA and the celebrities I’d met. As I talked, she lit a cigarette she had buried in her purse. A few drags in, she froze as we heard her mom coming around the corner, she shove the cigarette into my hand and took a big step back. Her mom gasped as she saw the American girl in her kitchen with a lit cigarette, smoke wafting towards her hanging plants. I froze.

Her mom screamed at me in Italian, shooing us out the door. As soon as we were safely on our way to the bar where her boyfriend was eagerly awaiting our arrival, she thanked me. "She doesn’t know I smoke, and she won’t care if you do. You know, because you’re American." After a long night of following Chiara around Pescara, meeting the throngs of men that where throwing themselves at her, we finally returned home to a dark apartment.

Her mom had left a note on her table for us. Chiara translated it for me, her mom had left some bread for me to eat in the morning, she knew I had a really early flight. She had also packed up some of the chicken for me to take with me on my flight. I was touched. "That’s good," I said, "She must not hate me."

"Oh no," Chiara responded, "Even if she does she would still feed you. No one will ever go hungry in my moms house, friend or enemy."

To this day I have no idea if there is an older Italian woman on the East Coast of Italy that abhors the thought of me, but either way, her chicken is fantastic.

Honey Mustard Mushroom Stout Chicken: 30 minute, one pot chicken dinner.

Honey Mustard Mushroom Stout Chicken

30 minutes

Yield: 4-6 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 lbs chicken thighs
  • 1 tbs salt
  • 1 tbs pepper
  • 2 tbs butter
  • ¼ cup chopped shallots
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 8 wt oz mushrooms (shitake, crimini, oyster. Fresh not dried)
  • 1 cup stout beer
  • ½ cup beef broth
  • (simmer until reduced by about half)
  • 2 tsp chopped fresh thyme
  • 2 tsp chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 tbs raw honey
  • 1 tbs whole grain mustard
  • ¼ cup heavy cream
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • rice for serving

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 425.
  2. Sprinkle the chicken on all sides with salt and pepper.
  3. Melt the butter in a pan over medium high heat. Add the chicken, skin side down, cook until skin is browned and crispy, flip the chicken, cooking on the other side until slightly browned. Remove from pan (chicken will not be cooked through).
  4. Add the shallots, reduce heat to medium, cooking until slightly browned. Add the garlic and mushrooms, cooking until the mushrooms have softened, about five minutes. Add the beer, scraping to deglaze the pan. Simmer until reduced by half. Add the broth, thyme, rosemary, honey, and mustard, simmer for about five minutes. Add the cream, simmer until slightly thickened.
  5. Add the chicken back into the pan, place the pan in the oven (make sure this pan is oven safe, if not everything can be transferred to a baking dish instead) roast at 425 for 20 minutes or until the chicken is cooked to 170F degrees.
  6. Serve over rice with sauce.

Notes

Note: if the skin is no longer crispy after roasting, place pan under a preheated broiler for about 2 minutes or until skin has crisped.

https://domesticfits.com/honey-mustard-mushroom-stout-chicken/

Honey Mustard Mushroom Stout Chicken: 30 minute, one pot chicken dinner.

Pumpkin Porter Beer Brownies Sundaes

Pumpkin Porter Brownies Sundaes1

Pumpkin things are upon us.

Of course we have those pumpkin spice lattes that the weather is far too warm to warrant, and the overly orange plastic pumpkins that Target is trying to push on us, but it’s the beer that gets me most excited. It can be a triple digit August afternoon when a package of pumpkin porter arrives and I’ll still break into it as soon as I can open the box.

As early as July those hotly anticipated squash infused brews start to hit bottle shops and brew pubs across the land. From a pale lager to a deep stout, every style of beer has had a tryst with a pumpkin. Every brewer has a different take. Some like to spice it up, others favor a drinkable pumpkin pie, while some want the flavor to be a subtle background note you should have to work at identifying. Whatever you prefer when it comes to this super special release category, there is a beer that will suit your mood.

Pumpkin Porter Brownies Sundaes2

A box of He Said Baltic Porter brewed with pumpkin and spice arrived on my door step last week reminding me that the days of driving with the windows down and eating ice cream outdoors are rapidly coming to a close. So I did what any rational person would do: I made brownies. But, somehow, that didn’t seem like enough. So I made a pumpkin porter infused chocolate sauce and added in the more weather appropriate giant scoop of cold ice cream. Which makes this the perfect transitional recipe from the heat wave afternoons to the fireside evenings. It’s both pumpkin and ice cream, regardless of the weather in your town, this recipe fits.

Porters are a great vehicle for the flavors of pumpkin. The deep earthiness is delivered well with the roast notes of the darker beers and this beer is no exception. The flavors of pumpkin in He Said are perfectly mild in a way that I prefer, these beers can often be treated heavy handed. This Baltic porter delivers the flavors of pumpkin and spice without molesting you with them, it’s more seductive. It’s a deep, smooth porter that draws you in. And, apparently, makes you bake things. Or maybe that’s just me.

Pumpkin Porter 21st

 

Pumpkin Porter Brownies Sundaes

Ingredients

    For the brownies:
  • 1 ½ cups unsalted butter, cut into cubes
  • 10 wt ounces 60% chocolate (about 2 cups)
  • 1 cup pumpkin porter
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 ½ cups white sugar
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 cup bread flour
  • ½ tsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp espresso powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • For the Sundae:
  • 10 wt oz dark chocolate (53% cocoa)
  • 2 tbs light corn syrup
  • 1/3 cup pumpkin porter
  • 1 quart vanilla ice cream

Directions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400. In the top of a double boiler, or metal bowl set over (but not touching) gently simmering water, add the butter and the chocolate. Stir occasionally until just melted. Remove from heat, stir in 1 cup pumpkin porter and vanilla extract.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat the eggs on high until light and frothy, about 2 minutes. Add both kinds of sugar and beat for 6 full minutes. Add the pumpkin puree, stir until combined.
  3. In a separate bowl add the flour, cinnamon, espresso powder, salt and cocoa powder, whisk until well combined.
  4. While the mixer is on low, add the chocolate mixture to the eggs. Mix until well incorporated, stopping to scrape the bottom of the bowl to insure the batter is fully combined.
  5. Remove the bowl from the stand mixer, sprinkle with dry ingredients. Stir until just combined.
  6. Grease a 9x13 baking dish, or spray with butter flavored cooking spray, pour in batter.
  7. Place in the oven and immediately reduce to 350. Bake at 350 for 35 minutes. The top should look completely dry but the center should still be fudgy. Don’t over bake. Remove from oven and allow to cool until set and come to room temperature before attempting to cut, about 1 hour.
  8. Add the dark chocolate, corn syrup, and 1/3 cup pumpkin porter to the top of a double boiler over medium heat.
  9. Stir until melted and well combined, remove from heat, pour over ice cream.
https://domesticfits.com/pumpkin-porter-beer-brownies-sundaes/

 

Pumpkin Porter Brownies Sundaes3

 

 

 

Beer Marshmallows with Chocolate Mint Beer Sauce

Beer Marshmallows with Mint Chocolate Stout Sauce

I told you last year that I wouldn’t further assault you with tales of my trip to Ireland for Saint Patrick’s day, until it was close to Saint Patrick’s Day.

Beer Marshmallows with Mint Chocolate Stout Sauce2

But here we are, just a week away. So I’ll force another story of Ireland down your throat. But I made you some beer marshmallows so I hope we can call it even.

The night after I arrived in Dublin, still jet-lagged and a bit shaky, I found myself at a table in the back of an old Irish pub with a couple of Irish farmers in their early twenties. A scrawny, fair-haired, Irish boy, who admitted that he’d never left the mossy soil of Mother Ireland, asked me about life in the famed Los Angeles. "So…you’ve, like, met famous people. Like movie stars? and people in bands?"

Beer Marshmallows with Mint Chocolate Stout Sauce3I said that I had. Just part of living in LA and having friends who work in music. It wasn’t a big deal. His eyes widened, he bought the next round and pressed me for details, "WHO HAVE YOU MET?!"

I was felt slightly pushed back and delved into the database of my past celebrity meetings. I wasn’t sure who he’d like to hear about so I started to go with my favorites, "Ummm. I met James Brown once. He told me I was pretty and did a spin for me."

He was confused. "Who’s that? Who else have you met? Do you know Madonna"

"No. But I did go to Elton Johns birthday party. It was small, only a handful of people but I was too nervous to talk to him. But I did spend the night talking with-"

"Let me cut to the chase." He turned serious, he wanted to get right to the information he was looking for, "I want to know if you’ve met THE GUY."

I was blank. Who was the GUY? Which guy?

Beer Marshmallows with Mint Chocolate Stout Sauce4

 

"You know!" The dozen Guinnesses he’d had since he’d left the sheep farm were starting to settle into his demeanor.

"I really don’t know. Who’s THE GUY in Hollywood?" I was more curious than confused.

Exasperated he finally spit it out, "EDDIE MURPHY!"

"Oh. No." If I’d had one million guesses I wouldn’t have pulled that name, "I haven’t met him."

"That’s too bad. But you know, he lives in LA. So, you might. Right? At some point, like at Starbucks or something?"

"Ummm, yeah. I guess there’s still hope."

Beer Marshmallows with Mint Chocolate Stout Sauce5

But, sadly I did leave LA  never having met Eddie Murphy. So unless he’s a Seahawks fan, we may never meet. But I do suspect that if he’s a beer drinker, he might like beer marshmallows. With stout chocolate sauce. And if he doesn’t, then it’s probably a good thing we never met.

Beer Marshmallows with Mint Chocolate Stout Sauce6

 

Beer Marshmallows with Chocolate Mint Beer Sauce

Ingredients

    For The Marshmallows
  • Powdered sugar
  • 3 ½ envelopes unflavored gelatin (such as Knox)
  • 1 cup beer (flat and cold)*
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • ½ cup light corn syrup
  • 2 large egg whites
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 3 tsp vanilla extract
  • For the Chocolate Sauce
  • 10 wt oz dark mint chocolate (I used Green & Blacks)
  • 1/3 cup chocolate stout

Directions

  1. Grease a 9x13 baking pan, sprinkle with powdered sugar until well coated, set aside.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer add ½ cup cold flat beer. Sprinkle with gelatin. Allow to stand while the sugar is being prepared.
  3. In a large saucepan (mixture will bubble up considerably) over medium heat, add the remaining ½ cup beer, sugar and corn syrup. Stir until the sugar has dissolved.
  4. Raise heat to high and allow to boil until the mixture reads 240F on a candy thermometer (about 6-8 minutes).
  5. Once the temperature has been reached, turn off heat.
  6. Turn the mixer on low and slowly pour the hot sugar mixture into the gelatin. Once all the sugar has been added turn the mixer on high until light and fluffy and tripled in volume, about 6 minutes.
  7. While the mixer is running, prepare the egg whites. Add the egg whites to a bowl with the salt. Beat on high with a hand mixer until stiff peaks form.
  8. Gently fold the egg whites and vanilla extract into the stand mixer ingredients until just combined.
  9. Pour the marshmallows into the prepared pan. Sprinkle with powdered sugar. Allow to set at room temperature until set, about 2 hours. Remove from pan, cut into squares.
  10. To make the chocolate sauce, add all chocolate sauce ingredients to a microwave safe bowl. Microwave on high for 30 seconds, stir and repeat until melted.
  11. Dip the marshmallows into the chocolate, remove with a fork, set on wax paper until set. Or just pour it on in a ridiculous but photogenic stream to make a delicious mess.

Notes

*The beer in these marshmallows can be very present. Pick a beer you like. Try to avoid really high hop beers, they can get really bitter. If you want a low beer flavor, pick a pilsner, pale lager, or wheat beer. You can also use a malty belgian or a brown ale. If you LOVE hops, you can use an IPA but take note that the beer bitterness will be very present.

https://domesticfits.com/beer-marshmallows-chocolate-mint-beer-sauce/

 

Molasses Stout Glazed Salmon with Herb IPA Mashed Potatoes

Molasses Stout Glazed Salmon with Herb IPA Mashed Potatoes2

No matter how often you move, there are things that you forget. Every time. You forget that you won’t know which drawer to put Sharpie markers and batteries in (they always end up in the same drawer), you’ll turn to grab the knife from where is "used to be," you won’t know where the Target is, or where to take your dry cleaning, or where to buy the best prosciutto and you can forget about that guy who offered to sharpen your knives for free if you bring him cookies THAT guy doesn’t exist in your new land.

I have a gypsy soul, I’ve never missed my own bed, I don’t have the home sick gene, I’m never nervous about new roads or new words or new food. I look forward to building a new database of people and place. But there is a learning curve with a new place. Things I didn’t know that I didn’t know. I’ve had to adapt to a new climate, one that was not 80 degrees on Christmas, and involves a near wardrobe change when I need to run out to the car to grab the beer I left in the back.

But the upside is that beer would have been overly warm in my old land, in this place, it was the perfect 43 degrees and ready to drink.

Now I just need to find a guy to trade knife sharpening for baked goods and I’ll be half way there.

Molasses Stout Glazed Salmon with Herb IPA Mashed Potatoes

Ingredients

    For The Potatoes
  • 2 lbs russet potatoes, peeled and chopped
  • 6 tbs unsalted butter
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp sage, minced
  • ½ tsp thyme. minced
  • ½ tsp rosemary, minced
  • 3 tbs IPA beer
  • For the Salmon
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • ¼ cup shallots
  • 2 tbs soy sauce
  • 1/3 cup stout
  • 2 tbs molasses (not blackstrap)
  • ¼ tsp smoked paprika
  • ¼ tsp chili powder
  • ¼ tsp onion powder
  • 4 (4-6 ounce) Salmon fillets

Directions

    To Make the Potatoes:
  1. Add the potatoes to a pot of lightly salted boiling water. Allow to boil until fork tender. Drain and return to pot.
  2. Add the remaining potato ingredients, stir and mash with a potato masher until well combined.
  3. To Make The Salmon:
  4. Preheat oven broiler.
  5. Add the oil to a pot over medium high heat until hot but not smoking.
  6. Add the shallots, cook until softened and slightly browned, about 3 minutes.
  7. Add the soy, stout, molasses, smoked paprika,onion powder and chili powder. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally until slightly thickened, about 6 minutes.
  8. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Spray lightly with cooking spray (or drizzle with vegetable oil.
  9. Place salmon on the foil, skin side down.
  10. Brush liberally with glaze.
  11. Broil for 3 minutes, re-brush with glaze, and place under the broiler for 3 more minutes. Repeat (re-brushing and broiling) until the salmon is cooked through and flakes easily with a fork.
  12. Serve over potatoes.
https://domesticfits.com/molasses-stout-glazed-salmon-herb-ipa-mashed-potatoes/

Molasses Stout Glazed Salmon with Herb IPA Mashed Potatoes_

Stout Soaked Mushrooms and Herbed Goat Cheese Crostinis

LA to SEA

Photos from my Instagram account 

I made it.

From LA to Seattle, up Highway 1. Past fat lazy seals, miles of winding coastlines, epic Redwoods, and into an unusually sunny Seattle. Although the sun has now given way to the typical rain, it’s somehow comforting.

Although figuring out how to wield a camera in low light has been a bit challenging.

Stout Soaked Mushroom & Herbed Goat Cheese Crostini

But the food isn’t. This part of the word has gorgeous produce, fantastic seafood, incredible beer. I’m starting to get familiar with the Northwest breweries and the beautiful beer that I’m now so close to. If you know of a local brewery I should go to, please, I’m all ears.

Stout Soaked Mushroom & Herbed Goat Cheese Crostini4

As I unpack the boxes, rely heavily on my navigation to get around, figure out what local stations to set my car radio to,  and try to amend my ill-equipped wardrobe (warm socks?? I need new socks?), I’m excited to be here. My Gypsy Soul gets to wander a new city.

Stout Soaked Mushroom & Herbed Goat Cheese Crostini3

Stout Soaked Mushrooms and Herbed Goat Cheese Crostinis

Ingredients

  • 1 wt oz (1 ½ cups) assorted dried mushrooms (I used Porcini, Shiitake & Chanterelle)
  • 12 ounces stout beer
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 2 tbs unsalted butter
  • ¼ cup chopped shallots
  • ½ tsp kosher or sea salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 1 baguette (sourdough or French)
  • 4 ounces chevre goat cheese, softened
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh thyme
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh sage
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh rosemary

Directions

  1. Put the mushrooms in a small bowl or jar. Cover with the stout beer. Leave at room temperature for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours or until the mushrooms are soft and have reconstituted.
  2. Drain the mushrooms and rinse well to remove any residual grit.
  3. Slice the mushrooms into thin slices (unless mushrooms were pre sliced).
  4. In a pan over medium high heat melt the butter with the olive oil.
  5. Add the shallots and cook until softened and starting to brown, about 5 minutes.
  6. Add the mushrooms to the pan, sprinkle with salt and pepper, cook until most of the oil and butter has been absorbed, about 5 minutes.
  7. Preheat the boiler on the oven.
  8. Slice the baguette into 18-24 slices.
  9. Place the slices on a baking sheet. Place until the broiler until golden brown, about 2 minutes, flip over and place under the broiler until golden brown the opposite side.
  10. In a small bowl stir together the goat cheese, thyme, sage and rosemary.
  11. Spread each slice with goat cheese, top with mushrooms.
  12. Serve immediately.
https://domesticfits.com/stout-soaked-mushrooms-herbed-goat-cheese-crostinis/

Stout Soaked Mushroom & Herbed Goat Cheese Crostini5

Chocolate Porter Berry Cobblers

Chocolate Porter Berry Cobbler 3

There is this way that I make food that I can only really see in retrospect as a mirror to how I’m feeling. Messy food means that I’ve wandered into internal chaos. It’s OK, there are much less healthy ways of dealing with emotions than the culinary mood ring that my kitchen becomes.

There are some changes on my horizon, good changes, but ones that will put me on a new path. A path I’m ready for, excited for, but the thing about transition is you can only clearly see what you are giving up. What you have to gain is still a mystery, but you have a firm account of what will be lost in the shift. It takes faith in yourself, and those decision you’ve made, to keep your eyes firmly on the next trapeze bar after you’ve already let go of the one you were holding, flying through the air with nothing more than hope in what you’ve decided to do. Faith that the world will conspire in your favor.

I’m not going to keep you in the dark for long. I want you to join me in this transition, this journey. But today isn’t for that. Today is for eating chocolate, drinking beer and enjoying the moment. More about my figurative trapeze leap later.

Chocolate Porter Berry Cobbler_

Chocolate Porter Berry Cobbler

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

    Topping
  • ¾ cup flour
  • ¼ cup quick oats
  • ¼ cup white sugar
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ½ cup chilled butter
  • Filling
  • 3 cups berries* (thawed if frozen)
  • 7 wt oz dark chocolate (about 1 ¼ cups)
  • ¾ cup porter or stout (I used Stone Smoked Porter with Vanilla Bean)

Directions

  1. Add the flour, oats, both sugars, and salt to a food processor, pulse to combine.
  2. Add the butter, process until combined.
  3. Place in the freezer until the filling is ready.
  4. In a double boiler over medium heat, add the chocolate and the beer, stir until melted, remove from heat.
  5. Stir in the berries.
  6. Place 4 oven safe bowls (8 to 10 fl oz size) on a baking sheet.
  7. Add the filling to the bowls, about 2/3 full.
  8. Add the topping until level with the top of the bowl.
  9. Bake at 350 until golden brown, about 45-50 minutes.

Notes

I used a combination of strawberries, raspberries and blackberries. Because overly ripe berries are so hard to ship, most pickers choose those to freeze, making frozen berries of a very high quality. Don't be afraid to use frozen berries when baking, they are often the best choice and most often frozen in season rather then grown in greenhouses out of season like some berries often are in the winter.

https://domesticfits.com/chocolate-porter-berry-cobblers/

Chocolate Porter Berry Cobbler 2

Chocolate Stout Shortbread Cookies

 

Chocolate Stout Shortbread Cookies3

I need to start a petition.

To change the usually paring of Milk and Cookies to Beer and Cookies. First of all, it’s just a better idea. If you want to lure friends over, "Hey I’ve got beer and cookies" will go over much better than the alternative. Second, milk is gross. Sure, you turn it into butter, cream or cheese and I’m in. But a tall glass of liquid that was recently inside of a cow just makes me gag. I’m not sure if I have ever in my life drank a glass of milk that wasn’t in the form of blended ice cream. Not even as a kid, I was the juice and cookies type. Now, it’s beer. A nice milk stout is as close as you can get me.

So next time you find yourself at my house and I offer you cookies, don’t expect a glass of milk. But I will give you some good beer, and some cookies made with beer. So I hope that’s a good substitution.

Of course it is, it’s beer and cookies.

Chocolate Stout Shortbread Cookies2

 

Chocolate Stout Shortbread Cookies

Ingredients

    For the Shortbread
  • 1 ½ cups butter, softened
  • 1 ¼ cup sugar
  • ½ tsp almond extract
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 3 cups flour
  • 2 tbs cornstarch
  • For the chocolate layer:
  • 3 cups (18 wt. oz) dark chocolate chips (60%)
  • 2 tbs heavy cream
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons chocolate stout or imperial stout
  • 1 tsp Fleur de sel or other flaky sea salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 325.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer add the butter, sugar, almond extract and vanilla extract. Beat until well combined, light and fluffy, about 5 minutes.
  3. Sprinkle with the salt, flour and cornstarch, mix until just combined.
  4. Line a 9x13 baking pan with parchment paper. Press the shortbread dough into the bottom of the baking sheet in an even layer.
  5. Prick all over with a fork.
  6. Bake at 325 for 25-30 minutes or until the edges have just started to turn golden.
  7. In the top of a double boiler (or a metal bowl set over a pot of water, but not touching the water) over gently simmering water, add the chocolate, cream and stout. Stir until the chocolate is smooth and melted. Pour over the shortbread in an even layer.
  8. Sprinkle with salt. Chill until set, about 3 hours and up to overnight.
  9. Cut into squares. Chill until ready to serve.
https://domesticfits.com/chocolate-stout-shortbread-cookies/

Chocolate Stout Shortbread Cookies

Rosemary Beer Biscuits with Stout Sausage Gravy

Rosemary Beer Biscuits with Stout Sausage Gravy4

Let’s pretend for a second that you’ve never had biscuits and gravy.

Like you’ve never sat in good company at a crappy diner in a small town eating sub par biscuits and gravy washing it down with shitty coffee like it’s the best breakfast you’ve ever had. Like you’ve never had someones grandma make them for you so early in the morning you could hardly keep your eyes open. Like you’ve never delayed the start of day two of a road trip just so that you could have a plate of southern comfort food from that place your friend once told you about.

Rosemary Beer Biscuits with Stout Sausage Gravy

But we can’t do that. Because there is something about that combination of simple ingredients, done just right, that stays with us forever. The way the perfect song pouring out your car windows as you drive down a softly worn country road on a summer afternoon makes you feel like everything’s right in the world.

The food that stays with us, that comforts us, reminds us of home, is almost always simple food. It’s these dishes that are worth making, and remaking, over and over, making small adjustments that no one but us really notices, because dishes like this stay with us.

Rosemary Beer Biscuits with Stout Sausage Gravy2

 

 

Rosemary Beer Biscuits with Stout Sausage Gravy

Yield: 6-8 servings

Ingredients

    For the biscuits:
  • 3 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp chopped fresh rosemary
  • 8 tbs unsalted cold butter, cut into cubes
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 2/3 cup Belgian ale (or wheat beer)
  • 2 tbs melted butter
  • ¼ tsp course sea salt
  • For the gravy:
  • 1 lb pork sausage (raw, without casing)
  • ¼ cup finely chopped white onion
  • 1 tbs butter
  • 6 tbs flour
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup stout
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • Optional
  • 4 large eggs, fried

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. In a processor add flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, sugar, and rosemary.
  3. Pulse to combine. Add the cold butter, process until well combined. Add to a large bowl.
  4. Add the buttermilk and beer. Mix with a fork until just combined.
  5. Add to a well-floured flat surface, pat into a rectangle. Using a cold rolling pin (preferably marble) gently roll into a large rectangle, about 1 inch in thickness, using as few strokes as possible.
  6. Fold the dough into thirds as you would a letter about to go into an envelope. Roll lightly, once in each direction to about 1 inch thickness, fold in thirds again. Gently roll into about 1 1/2 inch thickness (this will give you the flakey layers).
  7. Using a biscuit cutter cut out 6 to 8 biscuits. Place in a baking pan that has been sprayed with cooking spray.
  8. Brush biscuits with melted butter, sprinkle salt.
  9. Bake at 400 for 12 to 15 minutes or until the tops are golden brown.
  10. To make the gravy add the sausage to a pan over medium high heat. Cook, breaking up with a wooden spoon, until browned. Add the onions and butter, stirring and cooking until onions are browned, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with flour. Whisk until flour is well combined. Cook until flour has browned. Add the milk, stout, Worcestershire, salt, pepper and cayenne pepper. Cook until thickened, about 8 minutes.
  11. Top the biscuits with gravy and fried eggs, if desired.
https://domesticfits.com/rosemary-beer-biscuits-stout-sausage-gravy/

A HUGE Thank You to my Facebook Fans who suggested I work on a Beer Biscuits and Gravy recipe. You guys are always an inspiration.

Rosemary Beer Biscuits with Stout Sausage Gravy3

Stout French Onion Soup

Stout French Onion Soup 6

French Onion Soup was Julia Child’s last meal. Seems fitting for a woman known for French classics. And who wants to mess with a classic dish that America’s Culinary Grandma chose as her last meal?

Me. That’s who.

Stout French Onion Soup 4

Although I do like to stick to classic methods when it comes to cooking this warm bowl of cheese-topped-comfort, the addition of a malty stout gives a new dimension and depth of flavor. While most French Onion Soup recipes all have nearly the same ingredients, the results vary widely depending on how you treat the onions, the star ingredient.

Stout French Onion Soup 7

Stick with sweet onions when making this dish, the higher sugar content gives you a better caramelization. Cook them for a long time. Then cook them longer.

Caramelized onions will actually give off a "beefy" flavor when cooked slow and low for an extended period of time. This is one of the major key factors in bringing a soup from "good" to "great".

Although I’m sure Julia would have wanted to throw a copy of The Way To Cook at my head for putting beer in her soup, I’ll just have to make peace with that. I love a beerified soup.

Stout French Onion Soup_

 

Stout French Onion Soup

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 6 tbs butter
  • 2 lb sweet white onion, sliced into ¼ inch rings
  • 1 tbs brown sugar
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 cups stout, divided
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • ½ tsp fresh cracker black pepper
  • 4 slices French bread, toasted
  • 8 ounces shredded or sliced Gruyère cheese (about 2 1/2 cups)

Instructions

  1. In a large pot over medium high heat melt the butter. Add the onions, brown sugar and salt, allow to simmer over low to medium heat, stirring occasionally, until onions are a dark golden brown, at least 30 minutes and up to one hour (the longer onions cook the more flavor develops).
  2. Add ½ cup stout beer, simmer until the beer is reduced and the pan is almost dry.
  3. Add the remaining beer, beef stock and black pepper. Simmer for ten minutes.
  4. Pre heat the broiler on your oven.
  5. Ladle soup into bowls, top with slices of French bread toast and then cheese.
  6. Broil until the cheese has melted.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by Yummly Rich Recipes
https://domesticfits.com/stout-french-onion-soup/

 

 

Mushroom Quinoa Porter Chili & Is Beer Vegan?


Mushroom Quinoa Porter Chili, vegan and gluten free

 Is Beer Vegan?

From an outsiders perspective, the question might seems silly. Beer, after all, is made from plants and water. At its most basic, the ingredients to make beer are simple: water, malt, hops, yeast; all of which are clearly non-animal. And while brewmasters have a way of working everything from bacon to whole chickens into their beer, the biggest culprits are more subtle.

 Is Beer Vegan?-2

Sometimes, the de-veganized beers are easy to spot, a milk stout that uses lactose, or a honey kolsch, but more often than not, our veggie loving beer friends are in the dark as to whether an animal part has made its way into their pints. Since the CDC, the TTB, the FDA and all the other acronym loving agencies that have their grubby paws in what we consume do not require anyone to disclose the use of animal byproducts in the processing of food or beverages, it often gets left off the label (in fact, almost always).

The biggest offenders are what brewers use to clarify beer. While the need for clarifying is often done with non animal ingredients, or replaced with a centrifuge machine, it’s still common for breweries to use ingredients like gelatin or fish bladders as clarifying agents rendering beer not only non-vegan but non-vegetarian. There is also the foam control issue, and I’m not talking about the frothing of the mouth that occurs when your favorite stout is on Nitro, but the desire brewers have to give you that perfect level of foam head on your pints. To gain control on that lovely can’t-you-settle-yet-I-need-a-drink-now head on your beer, brewers have been known to use pepsin (made from pigs) or albium (made from animal blood) to give you the perfect pour.

Is Beer Vegan?

But if you are one of the growing numbers of craft beer loving veggie devotees, don’t despair. Many, many breweries are hip to your vibe, vegan beer is a concern for many. When it comes to finding out if your beer is sans-beasts, google is your friend. Also, websites like Barnivore give a great and growing list of vegan friendly breweries and beers.

For this recipe I used Sierra Nevada Porter, a vegan beer. In fact, as a company, Sierra Nevada is 100% vegan friendly.

Mushroom Quinoa Porter Chili, vegan and gluten free

As an addendum to this, it needs to be mentioned that there is nothing wrong with the use of animal products in beer. Milk stout is a favorite of mine, and a good honey kolsch is great to pair with a summer cook out. However, disclosure is key and giving people the information they need to keep the diet they choose is a way to keep us all friends in this craft beer community.

Mushroom Quinoa Porter Chili

Ingredients

  • 3 tbs olive oil
  • 8 ounces crimini mushrooms, minced
  • ½ cup onions, chopped
  • ½ cup diced carrots
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/4 cups broth
  • 1 cup porter or stout beer, divided
  • ½ cup red quinoa, dry
  • 1 (15 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • ½ cup corn kernels
  • ½ tsp smoked paprika
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp cumin
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • 1 jalapeno, diced
  • 2 cups tomatoes, chopped
  • 1/2 tsp Sriracha (or other red chili sauce)
  • 1 avocado, diced
  • ½ cup green onion, chopped
  • ½ cup cilantro, chopped

Directions

  1. Heat the olive oil in a pot over medium high heat, add the mushroom, sauté until darkened and softened, about 5 minutes.
  2. Add the onions and carrots and cook until softened about 5 minutes.
  3. Stir in the garlic then add the broth and ½ cup beer. Stir in the dry quinoa, allow to simmer, stirring occasionally, until quinoa is cooked through, about 15 minutes.
  4. Add the beans, bell pepper, corn, smoked paprika, pepper, salt, cumin and garlic powder, allow to simmer for 5 minutes.
  5. Add the remaining beer, jalapenos, tomatoes, and sriracha, simmer for 10 minutes or until slightly thickened and reduced.
  6. Ladle into bowls, top with avocado, green onion and cilantro.
https://domesticfits.com/mushroom-quinoa-porter-chili-beer-vegan/

Mile High Chocolate Stout Pie

Mile High Chocolate Stout Pie

This past Sunday, as I stood at a podium in the middle of a convention center talking about the glorious interplay of beer & chocolate  and how to pair the two, I was asked which chocolate stout I recommend.

All I could think of was this Rogue Chocolate Stout that I’d spent a day turning into an excessively large pie. A stout that has all the undeniable lurings of two of the most enticing guilty pleasures: beer & chocolate. If there has ever been a Poster Beer for converting prohibitionists into soused up stout drinkers it’s a beer infused with chocolate.

I also hear their is a beer cocktail of sorts, a mix of Rogue Chocolate Stout & Rogue Hazelnut Brown Nectar, that tastes like a Snickers bar. It’s almost more than should be allowed by law: a boozy liquid snickers. I’ll take one, and a giant slice of pie. And a day off tomorrow.

Mile High Chocolate Stout Pie

Course Dessert
Servings 6 people

Ingredients
  

For the crust:

  • 2 cups chocolate wafer cookies or 9 chocolate graham crackers about 1 ½ cups of crumbs
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 5 tablespoons melted butter

For the chocolate fudge layer:

  • 8 wt oz dark chocolate
  • 1/3 cup chocolate stout
  • 3 tablespoons heavy cream

For the mousse layer:

  • 10 wt oz dark chocolate
  • 1/2 cup chocolate stout
  • 3 cups heavy cream chilled
  • ¼ cup powdered sugar

For the mascarpone whipped cream:

  • 8 wt oz mascarpone cheese softened
  • ¾ cup powdered sugar
  • 2 cup heavy cream chilled
  • 1 teaspoons vanilla extract

Instructions
 

Make the crust:

  • Preheat oven to 350.
  • Add the wafer cookies (or graham crackers) and sugar to a food processor and process until just crumbs. While the food processor is running add the melted butter and process until well combined. Add to a deep dish 9.5 inch pie pan. Starting with the sides, press into shape. Press the crust very well until even and compacted.
  • Bake at 350 for 10 minutes.
  • Remove from oven and allow to cool.

Make the chocolate fudge layer:

  • Add the chocolate to a small bowl.
  • Heat the stout and cream together until very hot and just starting to steam (microwave or stove top will both work fine). Pour hot liquid over the chocolate and stir until the chocolate has melted and is well combined with the stout and cream. Pour in an even layer in the bottom of the crust. Refrigerate until set, about 30 minutes.

Make the mousse layer:

  • Add the chocolate to a small bowl. Heat the stout until very hot and just starting to steam (microwave or stove top will both work fine). Pour hot beer over the chocolate and stir until the chocolate has melted and is well combined with the stout. Allow to cool to room temperate. In the bowl of a stand mixer add the cream and powdered sugar, building up speed beat on high until medium peaks form. While the mixer is running slowly drizzle the chocolate into the mixer. Once all the chocolate has been added, stop the mixer and remove the bowl. Using a wooden spoon or spatula gently fold until the chocolate and cream have been well combined.
  • Add the mousse to the pie crust in an even layer, refrigerate until set, about 3 hours.

Make the whipped cream layer:

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer beat the mascarpone and powdered sugar until well combined. Add the heavy cream and vanilla, beat on high until medium peaks form. Spread in an even layer on top of the pie. Chill until ready to serve.
Keyword chocolate, mile high, mousse, pie, stout

 

Stout Braised Pulled Pork Chili

Stout Pulled Pork Chili

If you want to watch a culinary sports crowd get rilled up, ask what the "right way to make chili" really is. Just meat? Beans? No beans? Pork, vegetables, beef? Tomatoes? Because if you do it "wrong" you might was well be at  Morton’s and ask for ketchup with your steak. Or waltz yourself in the kitchen of a southern Grandma and boss her biscuit making ways around: you might get yourself punched.

I happen to be a bit more of a wandering chili Gypsy, the only requirement that I see necessary is a kick of heat. Some days I want beans, some days I want to pack it full of pork, chipotle stout, hold the beans and top it with pork rinds.

Regardless of your "right" way to make chili, I hope your take away from this recipe is that the braising liquid, what is left after a pork shoulder simmers in beer for 4 hours, is the perfect liquid to use in chili. It’s packed with flavor, beer, broth, spices, and meaty goodness. Don’t wash it down the drain, strain it and save it for making soup and chili. Even freezing it if you have to.

It’s like a free secret ingredient, even if you still have to fight with your brother in law about why you want to add beans.

Stout Pulled Pork Chili 2

Stout Braised Pulled Pork Chili

Ingredients

    For the Pork
  • 1 tbs brown sugar
  • 1 tbs salt
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • ½ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 2.5-3 lb pork butt (pork shoulder)
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 24 ounces stout beer (or porter)
  • 2 cups beef stock
  • For the Chili
  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 1/2 red onion, diced
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can stewed tomatoes
  • 3-4 chipotle peppers in adobo, minced
  • 2 tsp adobo sauce from chipotle can
  • Garnish:
  • 1 cup sharp cheddar, shredded
  • ½ cup cilantro, chopped
  • ½ cup red onion, chopped
  • 1 large tomato, chopped

Directions

  1. In a small bowl stir together the brown sugar, salt, onion powder, garlic powder, smoked paprika, and cayenne pepper.
  2. Sprinkle pork on all sides with spice mixture.
  3. Heat the olive oil in a large Dutch oven until hot but not smoking. Sear pork on all sides until browned.
  4. Pour the beer and beef stock over the pork.. Reduce heat to a low simmer. Add a lid at a vent and allow to cook until pork is very tender and shreds easily, about 4 hours. Remove from the pot, shred using two forks, return to the pot and allow to simmer for 5-10 minutes. Remove meat from the pot with a slotted spoon to drain off excess moisture (reserve braising liquid).
  5. In a separate pot heat 2 tbs olive oil, cook the onions and red pepper until soft, about 4 minutes. Stir in the garlic. Add 1 ½ cups of the pork braising liquid, black beans, kidney beans, tomatoes, chipotle pepper and adobo sauce. Simmer for 20 minutes.
  6. Serve topped with cheddar, cilantro, red onion, tomatoes and pulled pork.
https://domesticfits.com/stout-braised-pulled-pork-chili/

Stout Pulled Pork Chili 3

 

Salted Beer Caramel Corn

Salted Beer Caramel Corn

Today is the day.

Today, September 18th,  the book I spent months creating, turning myself into a figurative nightmare, pouring blood, sweat, tears and beer into each recipe, hits mailboxes and store shelves across the land. While I should be feeling excessively accomplished now that I can officially slap a Publish Author tittle after my name, there is also a thin film of vulnerability draped over today. Because more than I want it sell like Funfetti Cronuts, I want it to be well received, I want you to love it. I wish all the recipes to be Home Runs, every step to make sense to ever cook, and every Amazon reviews to be glowing.

What you think matters to me, probably more than it should. So if you buy this little book of mine, The Craft Beer Cookbook (affiliate link), and you have a question about a recipe, email me: Jackie@TheBeeroness.com. If you make a recipe and love it, tweet a picture to me @TheBeeroness. If you make a recipe on your own blog, share it on my Facebook page. I want to know what you think (let’s be honest) especially if it’s good.

While I spent the weekend worried about the release of cookbook, and working out the details of the book tour, I decided it was a great idea to stress eat caramel corn. I even made two batches.  The first batch I used a hoppy brown ale, which gave the caramel a mild beer flavor that was a bit lost once it coated the corn. The next batch I used an imperial stout, a big bold beer with enough monster taste to give the caramel corn notes of beer in every bite.

Caramel corn and a cookbook, not a bad Wednesday.

Salted Beer Caramel Corn

Salted Beer Caramel Corn

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup corn kernels
  • 2/3 cup brown sugar
  • 2 tbs light corn syrup
  • ½ cup imperial stout, plus 2 tbs, divided
  • 4 tbs butter
  • 1 tsp coarse sea salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 250.
  2. Place the corn kernels in a brown paper bag. Fold the top over. Place in the microwave (long side down), microwave on high for 4 minutes. When the popping starts to slow to about one pop per one second, remove from microwave. Measure out 7 cups of popcorn (if there is less than 7 cups, pop additional kernels in the same manner, if there are more than 7 cups, reserve the remaining popped corn for another use).
  3. Spray a large baking pan with cooking spray.
  4. Add the corn kernels to the baking sheet in an even layer, place in the oven until the caramel sauce is ready.
  5. Add the brown sugar, light corn syrup, ½ cup stout and butter to a saucepan over high heat. Stir until the sugar dissolves, stop stirring. Allow to boil for 7 minutes, without stirring. Remove from heat, immediately stir in the remaining 2 tablespoons stout.
  6. Spray a silicon spatula with cooking spray (except the handle).
  7. Gently pour the caramel sauce over the corn, stirring to coat.
  8. Bake for 20 minutes at 250, stir, and bake for an additional 20 minutes.
  9. Remove from oven and spread evenly onto a sheet of parchment or wax paper, sprinkle immediately with salt. Allow to cool, until hardened. Store in an air-tight container.
https://domesticfits.com/salted-beer-caramel-corn/

 

Salted Beer Caramel Corn 2

 

Pub Cookies

Pub Cookies made with beer, pretzels, chocolate chips and peanuts

I want to put a beer cooking trick up your sleeve. A secret skill to help maneuver the beer cooking universe with deft dexterity. I like to call this a Beer Extract, made by reducing that bottle of beer to a small but mighty beer syrup that fits nicely into a recipe that wants some beer flavor but is without the capacity to handle large volumes of beer right out of the bottle.

Pub Cookies made with beer, pretzels, chocolate chips and peanuts

It’s easy, really. Just simmer the beer long enough to remove the water, leaving all those other great flavors in a compact bite of beer essence. When a recipe, like these Pub Cookies, can only take a little bit of liquid and you want a bit o' that beer flavor to come through at the end, all you need to do is reduce the beer to remove the water and you’re all set.

While this might not bring you the large amounts of beer taste you might want, there is a subtle malty finish to the end flavor, along with those pretzels that always seem to love to tag along for the beer flavored ride.

Pub Cookies made with beer, pretzels, chocolate chips and peanuts

Pub Cookies

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

4 hours, 35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 12 ounces imperial stout or porter beer
  • 3/4 cup butter, cut into cubes
  • 2/3 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup white sugar
  • 1 egg plus 1 yolk
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup bread flour (this will make them chewy)
  • 1 tsp cornstarch
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 cup dark chocolate chips (60%)
  • 2/3 cup mini pretzel twists, broken into pieces
  • ¼ cup honey roasted peanuts

Directions

  1. In a pot over medium high heat add the beer and cook, stirring occasionally, until reduced to about 1 tbs, about 8 to 10 minutes.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add the butter and both types of sugar, beat until well creamed. Add the egg and the yolk, beat until well combined. Add the 1 tbs of beer, and vanilla extract and beat until well combined, scraping the bottom to make sure all the ingredients are well combined.
  3. In a separate bowl, add both types of flour, cornstarch, baking soda and salt. Mix well. Add dry ingredients to the stand mixer and mix on medium/low speed until just barely combined, don't over mix. Add the chocolate chips, pretzel pieces, and peanuts, and stir until incorporated.
  4. Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper, scoop golfball sized scoops of dough, roll them into round balls and place on the baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap and chill for at least 4 hours.
  5. Preheat oven to 350.
  6. Bake for 18-22 minutes or until light golden brown, don't over bake. (If you don't chill the dough, or if you make smaller sized cookies, the cooking time will be much shorter. Start to keep an eye on your cookies after about 12 minutes.)
https://domesticfits.com/pub-cookies/