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Egyptian Food: 17 Popular Dishes + 5 Secret Recipe Tips

Some visit Egypt for the pyramids and the Nile, while others come to indulge their taste buds in the unique cuisine. With countless hearty dishes and recipes that date back thousands of years, the food in this country will take you by surprise. So, which recipes should you try first? Read on to figure out.

Egyptian cuisine is full of hidden gems waiting for you to try out. In this article, we’ll take you on a trip to Cairo and explore a one-of-a-kind food scene that you won’t get enough of. We’ll also let you in on some secret tips to nail that authentic taste and get the full experience.

Traditional Egyptian Cuisine: More Than Koshari and Falafel

Traditional Egyptian Cuisine: More Than Koshari and Falafel

Whenever someone mentions Egyptian cuisine, the first thing that comes to everyone’s mind is the popular koshari dish.

Well, we can’t blame them. It’s a super tasty and unique dish you won’t find anywhere else in the world. However, there’s more to this exceptional cuisine than just koshari and falafel.

From feteer and hawawshi to the incredible molokhiya, Cairo has something for everyone. You might even come across familiar recipes, but the Egyptian twist takes them to another level. So, buckle up while we take you on a journey full of delicious and unique flavors.

Most Popular Street Food in Egypt

Most Popular Street Food in Egypt

Walking down the historic streets of Egypt, you’ll come across many exquisite street vendors. It’s no secret that Egyptians are foodies, so you’ll find food trucks pretty much everywhere you go, from north to south.

Surprisingly, each region has its unique twist to the main recipe. That said, here are some of the most popular street foods in the country.

Ful

Ful

Ful is a slow-cooked fava bean stew. It’s a national favorite for a reason. Almost all street vendors and restaurants cook the beans fresh every morning. Then, they top the creamy fava with tons of flavorful add-ons, from fresh herbs and spices to zesty lemons.

This hearty dish comes in endless variations, but the one that caught us by surprise was the tahini and flaxseed oil recipe. This combination is a must-try. You also need to try ful with extra virgin olive oil, lemon, and cumin.

Although stewing your beans isn’t complicated, you can still make authentic Egyptian fava using the canned stuff. The trick to getting creamy beans is to smash them with a fork or use a hand blender.

Then, add some oil and season your beans with your favorite spices. For those who love an extra spicy kick, adding hot chili peppers will make your dish irresistible.

Falafel

Falafel

Egyptians love pairing their ful with falafel, especially for breakfast. Falafel, or taamya as they call it in Cairo, is one of the most popular street foods in the country.

Surprisingly, the main ingredient in this dish is also fava beans. However, in this case, they’re smashed and mixed with some greens. Then, they shape it into patties and deep-fry them.

The result is a delectable ball with a crispy outer layer and a soft green inside. The thing is, most Egyptians don’t eat taamya as it is. Instead, they make falafel sandwiches topped with extra veggies, tahini, and a sprinkle of spices.

Being a staple in Egyptian cuisine, you’ll find various versions of falafel. Some street vendors stuff it with a spicy red paste for an extra hot kick, and it’s called taamya mahsheya, or stuffed falafel.

Not big on spicy food? Well, you need to try cheesy falafel. Some modern chains stuff the green patties with cream cheese before frying, and it’s incredibly delicious.

Shawarma

Shawarma

While it originates from the Levant region, Shawarma has made its way to the streets and hearts of the Egyptians. These mouth-watering sandwiches are made with thin slices of marinated beef or chicken.

Some places wrap this meaty goodness in flatbread or Syrian bread. But the Egyptian way calls for soft buns, and we love both versions equally.

The problem is that staking a meat cone and roasting it can be a hassle. So, you can’t replicate the same experience at home. Yet, with the right spices and add-ons, your shawarma wrap will taste almost identical to the real one.

Here’s how to make the best homemade shawarma: Start by marinating your beef or chicken overnight. Then, cut your protein into thin slices, and don’t get rid of the fatty parts.

The fats add more flavor to the recipe and make your shawarma juicy. After that, cook the slices on high heat for a short period. Finally, top your beef sandwiches with tahini and the chicken wraps with garlic sauce.

Feteer

Feteer

Feteer meshaltet translates to “cushioned pies,” and it’s exactly what it sounds like. This flaky pastry consists of many thin layers of dough. The original recipe is plain but unbelievably tasty. Recently, they took it to the next level by filling the feteer with sweet and savory components.

Savory fillings stole the show for us. They stuff this gooey goodness with anything that comes to mind, including cheese, sausage, pastrami, ground beef, chicken, seafood, and even hot dogs. As for the standard sweet feteer recipe, they stuff it with milk pudding, coconut, and raisins.

That’s not all. You’ll love the modern version of sweet feteer if you have a sweet tooth. You can stuff your flaky pies with chocolate, cream, honey, fruits, and various sauces. We highly recommend sprinkling some roasted nuts on top too.

Egyptian Food in the World

Egyptian Food in the World

Egyptian cuisine is so tasty that it has traveled all across the globe. You can easily find Egyptian food vendors around big cities like New York.

If you head over to 53rd Street and 6th Avenue, you’ll find a long line of people waiting for their turn to order from the “Halal Guys.” They’re a couple of Egyptians who specialize in making platters of chicken and lamb over yellow rice, a Cairo classic recipe.

Also, Egyptian falafel has made its way to many countries, from Greece to Canada. Everybody wants to get a taste of these delicious green patties, and we can’t blame them.

You can also find many canned and packaged Egyptian food products in grocery shops, including fava beans, hummus, and tahini.

How Healthy Egyptian Food Is

How Healthy Egyptian Food Is – From Legumes to Grains

The answer to this question can be a little complicated. Here’s why: Many of the ingredients in Egyptian cuisine are green and healthy, from legumes and grains to different proteins.

However, the problem is that many of these ingredients end up fried rather than baked, like falafel. Of course, after frying, it’s not the healthiest option anymore.

On the bright side, you can easily find super healthy food across the streets of Cairo. For starters, there are tons of vendors who sell fresh fruits and vegetables.

And the best part is that they’re surprisingly cheap. Additionally, Egyptians love grilled and baked food. We highly recommend trying grilled chicken if you’re looking for a healthy meal.

Famous and Popular Egyptian Dishes You Have to Try

Famous and Popular Egyptian Dishes You Have to Try

Egyptian cuisine offers a huge variety of starters, mains, sides, and desserts that satisfy every taste—even the picky ones. So, whether you’re visiting the land of the pharaohs or want to have a taste of their cuisine, it can be a little overwhelming.

That’s why we’ve included some recipes you can’t miss out on. We’ve also included helpful tips from the heart of Cairo to help you nail that authentic taste.

Soups and Salads

Soups and Salads

Let’s kick off our list with some must-try soups and salads to warm up for your main dish.

Creamy Lentil Soup

Creamy Lentil Soup

This is one of the most comforting and heartwarming soups we’ve come across, and it’s perfect for cold winters. Egyptian lentil soup, known as shorbet ads, is simple yet incredibly delicious.

The mixture of lentils, tomatoes, shallots, onions, carrots, and chicken stock is out of this world. This creamy goodness tastes heavenly with cumin and garlic, so make sure to add them to your recipe.

What we love most about this recipe is that it’s super easy to make. All you need to do is cut the carrots and shallots into chunks. Then, add them to a pot on medium heat along with the garlic to soften.

When they’re starting to become mushy, add your lentils and spices while stirring. It shouldn’t take more than five minutes for your mouthwatering soup to be ready.

Molokhiya

Molokhiya

Molokhiya might not look appetizing at first glance, but it tastes much better than it looks. Take our word for it. Once you have a spoonful of this green goodness, you won’t be able to stop. This magical soup is made from mallow leaves, so it has a viscous texture.

It might look like a complex dish, but it’s easier than you think. To prepare this recipe, mince mallow leaves finely and mix them with broth. Top that off with sautéed garlic, and you’ve got yourself a hearty molokhiya soup. The Egyptians love eating it with bread, like a dip.

If you’re not a big fan of the texture, you can simply mix the molokhiya with white rice and enjoy the bursting flavors. Just make sure to leave some room for the main course.

Fun Fact: In Ancient Egypt, molokhiya was a popular dish among royalty, but it eventually became one of the country’s most popular foods.

Lesan Asfour Soup

Lesan Asfour Soup

Well, lissan asfour translates to bird’s tongue, but don’t worry, it’s just orzo pasta. You see the resemblance, right? Orzo pasta looks like large rice grains, or as Egyptians see it, birds’ tongues.

What’s even more interesting than the name is that they toast the pasta before adding it to the broth. Surprisingly, toasting the pasta deepens the flavor and adds nutty notes to the recipe.

To prepare lissan asfour soup, heat some butter and extra virgin olive oil over medium heat. Then, toast the orzo until golden brown, and top it off with broth, water, and your favorite spices. The seven spices mixture works well in this recipe, as it brings up all the flavors.

Bonus Tip: Up your game by adding a squeeze of fresh lemon juice to your lissan asfour soup.

Salata Baladi

Salata Baladi

Salata baladi is the standard salad in Egypt. This is a spring on the classic garden salad, infusing the Egyptian spirit into its unique taste and texture. It’s stable on the Egyptian dining table, especially with fatty meals, which is understandable since it’s healthy and incredibly easy to make.

The best part is that Egyptian salad includes ingredients you’ll readily find in your fridge. That includes tomatoes, red onions, cucumbers, and parsley. The trick here is to chop all the vegetables to equal size. This way, each bite of the salad has a mouthwatering blend of flavors.

Following that, make a simple vinaigrette with lemon juice, vinegar, and salt. If you want to nail this recipe, refrigerate the mixture for at least one hour before the meal.

This will help the flavors come together. Not only that, but the vegetables will also be crunchy, and you’ll have salad liquid that doubles as a tangy beverage.

Fun Fact: The locals add some extra water and spices to the salad and let it steep for a few hours before drinking it with a meal. They call it “halal whiskey,” and it’s worth a try.

Starters, Sandwiches, and Sides

Starters, Sandwiches, and Sides

Your meal isn’t perfect without a delectable starter or side dish to round it up. Here are some of our favorite Egyptian starters, sides, and sandwiches you need to try.

Mahshi

Mahshi

Mahshi has a special place in the hearts of all Egyptians. It’s a comforting, hearty dish consisting of stuffed veggies. A stuffing of rice, seasoned with tomatoes, parsley, dill, onion, and spices, is put into various vegetables.

Some restaurants add a little bit of ground beef to the rice, which makes it more delectable. Typically, they stuff eggplants, zucchini, and green peppers.

There’s also another version of mahshi that includes wrapping the rice with grape or cabbage leaves into small, finger-like portions. However, this one can be tricky.

That’s because it requires some rolling skills. But you’ll get the hang of it after the first batch. You can also find many tools that’ll help you roll a good piece of mahshi.

To make mahshi, you can start by preparing the rice. You want it only half-way cooked, as it’ll go back in the pot again inside the vegetables. Then, hollow out your greens using a corer.

Here comes the fun part: Stuff your veggies with the rice and place them in a pot with some chicken or beef broth. Alternatively, you can keep it vegan by skipping the minced meat and the broth.

Hawawshi

Hawawshi

Hawawshi is one of Egypt’s hidden gems that you need to try out. You can think of it as Cairo’s fattier, crispier version of a smash burger.

For us, it’s even more flavorful and easier to make compared to a burger. If you have pita bread, ground beef, and an oven or a skillet, you can try this simple recipe right now.

The secret behind these delicious sandwiches is the seasonings. The Egyptians have mastered the art of blending spices to create captivating flavors. Accordingly, the seasoning can make or break your hawawshi.

Here’s how to make it the Egyptian way: Mix onion juice, salt, black pepper, coriander, cardamom, allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg, and paprika with the ground beef thoroughly. Then, fill up your pita pockets with the seasoned meat.

You can either cook your sandwich in the oven or give it a quick fry in a buttered skillet for 10 minutes on each side. Either way, you’ll end up with crispy, buttered pita bread and a beautiful, seasoned patty. If you make this meal once, there’s no way it won’t be a dinner-stable.

Main Dishes

Main Dishes

Now it’s time for the star of the show. Egyptian cuisine is full of tasty surprises that help you break free from boring dinner staples.

Not only are these dishes incredibly delicious, but they’re rather easy to make at home. So, you won’t have to book a flight to Cairo to indulge in these magnificent flavors. That said, here are our top picks for Egyptian main dishes.

Stuffed Pigeons

Stuffed Pigeons

You probably won’t come across this dish in many other places in the world. But that’s sad news because this dish took us by surprise.

We understand you might be skeptical about stuffed pigeons, but trust us on this one. Stuffed pigeons are perhaps the most complex and flavorful dish on this list. It combines many flavor profiles in one bite. Pair that with some molokhiya on the side, and thank us later.

So, how do they prepare this unique dish? Well, first, they prepare a special rice with butter, onions, and pigeon liver. Second, they stuff the pigeons with the rice and boil it. Third, they deep-fry this heavenly dish, which enhances the flavors significantly.

All in all, it might not be the easiest dish to prepare, but it’s completely worth the try. After preparing this one-of-a-kind dish, set your forks and knives aside, as you’ll be using your bare hands.

You want to grab a pigeon and take one big bite that includes skin, rice, and meat. That’s how they do it in Egypt, so you’ll get the full experience.

Tarb

Tarb

For fatty, juicy meat lovers, this one’s for you. You’re probably familiar with kofta, a dish made with minced meat, onions, and a bit of fat.

Well, tarb is kofta wrapped in a layer of lamb fat and grilled until golden brown. So, if you’re keeping things healthy, you should skip out on this one. Let me tell you that this extra layer of fat is a game-changer. It adds a new dimension of flavor and juiciness to the meat.

This dish is perfect for cold, wintery nights, as the fats will keep you warm and happy. However, with that amount of fat in one meal, we recommend balancing things out with veggies.

You don’t want to add more carbs or fats to your meal. Egyptians typically pair tarb with salata baladi, tahini, and bread. That’s it. Even with no sides, you still might need a hand to finish this one.

Koshari

Koshari

Looking for a delicious vegan dish? Koshari is the way to go. The national dish of Egypt combines tons of flavors in one recipe. Although the flavor is complex, it’s one of the easiest recipes to make on our list. You might need to use a lot of pots to prepare it, though.

Koshari combines different types of pasta with vermicelli, rice, and brown lentils as a base. Then top that off with zesty tomato sauce and garlic vinegar for extra layers of flavor. For the final touch, add chickpeas, fried onions, and hot sauce.

Aside from being easy to make, it’s cheap and packed with nutrients. That’s why you’ll always find koshari shops packed with locals and tourists at any time of the day. In these shops, they serve this interesting mix with a side of baked or fried pita bread bites.

These bread pieces are super crunchy and well-seasoned, making them the perfect side for a dish like this one.

Macarona Béchamel

Macarona Béchamel

Macarona Béchamel is hands down our favorite Egyptian comfort food. With layers of different flavors, you won’t get enough of this creamy goodness. You can think of this dish as an Egyptian version of pasta baked with béchamel sauce. Yet, the béchamel clearly takes the win for us.

Imagine a layer of penne pasta covered with creamy béchamel and a layer of seasoned minced meat. Then, top that off with another layer of béchamel and mozzarella cheese. What more could you ask for? For us, that’s the perfect comfort food.

To prepare this dish, boil your pasta until al dente. While the pasta cooks, you can save time by preparing the meat sauce. Here’s how to do it: Dice some onions finely and sauté them till golden brown.

Then, add the beef along with some tomato sauce, nutmeg, allspice, and paprika. Let this mixture simmer until it’s completely cooked.

Making the béchamel sauce might seem like a complicated task, but it’s easier than you think. The trick is to melt butter in a deep pan and add your flour slowly while whisking.

You need to whisk continuously for around three to four minutes before adding room-temperature milk gradually. Finally, put the layers together as we’ve mentioned, top them off with some cheese, and it’s baking time.

Bread, Pastries, and Dessert

Bread, Pastries, and Dessert

Most Egyptians have a sweet tooth, so you’ll find dessert shops everywhere you go. The desserts and pastries in this country will take you by surprise. Here are some must-try recipes from the heart of Cairo.

Basbousa

Basbousa

Do you want to make an impressive dessert in a matter of minutes? Basbousa is the way to go. It’s a sweet semolina cake that’s cooked in simple syrup.

Yet, it’s still light, airy, and marvelous. Here’s the thing about basbousa: Even if you make a hundred alterations to this recipe, it’ll turn out perfect every single time.

The basic ingredients for this heavenly dessert are farina, sugar, yogurt, shredded coconut, ghee, and just a pinch of baking powder. Generally, the traditional Egyptian recipe calls for semolina.

However, Middle Eastern semolina can be a little different from the one you’ll find at your local grocery store. So, using farina will result in a more accurate basbousa experience.

Here’s our secret to making the best basbousa: Your mixture shouldn’t be more than one inch thick. Once it’s perfectly golden, douse it with simple syrup immediately.

All in all, you can enjoy your sweet treat right away. Nonetheless, we recommend letting your dessert cool off for a couple of hours while it absorbs the sweet syrup.

Lokmet Al Kadi

Lokmet Al Kadi

Zalabia, or lokmet al kadi, is a traditional Egyptian dessert that looks similar to the good old donut holes, but they’re more syrupy. These sweet bites are crispy on the outside and soft on the inside.

Typically, they’re popular during Ramadan, but you can find them all year long at many street vendors.

Luckily, you don’t have to be a dessert expert to make this one. It’s super easy to make and tastes astoundingly delicious.

Just scoop the leavened dough with a spoon and dunk it into hot oil for a minute. Then, take it out, let it dry, and give it another quick dunk in the oil for a crispier coating.

Finally, drizzle some powdered sugar or simple syrup on top and enjoy. You can also use a chocolate spread or any sauce you prefer, but we recommend keeping things simple for a more authentic experience.

Umm Ali

Umm Ali

Umm Ali is one of Egypt’s most iconic desserts. Legend has it that this dish was made to celebrate Sultan Ezz El Din Aybak’s victory, and it was shared amongst the people of Egypt. This unique dish is made with puff pastry, milk, cream, sugar, and nuts. So, it’s similar to the good old bread pudding.

Traditionally, it was served as a hot dish. However, in recent years, cold versions of this recipe have become popular.

Still, we prefer to eat it right out of the oven, especially during the winter months. The combination of crunchy top and silky smooth ingredients is out of this world.

Beverages

Beverages

Egypt is a hot country. Yet, you’ll find all the locals sipping on hot beverages in cafés under the blazing sun. Their love for tea comes before anything else.

They’ve also learned to cope with the hot climate by innovating the best refreshing cold drinks. So, no matter your taste, you’ll surely find a beverage that captivates you from the following list.

Black Tea

Black Tea

Black tea is the most popular beverage in the country. Egyptians consume around 65,000 to 75,000 tons of tea every year, and the market is endlessly growing.

So, you can easily tell how much they love their tea. Drinking this delicious beverage became part of the culture. Whether it’s morning, noon, or night, local cafés are always packed with Egyptians sipping their favorite drink.

Of course, there are different ways to prepare Egyptian tea. Aside from the good old tea bag and boiling water method, koshari tea is very popular, and no, they don’t put rice and pasta in their drink.

Making this version includes brewing the tea with mint leaves and sugar for more intense flavors. It might be a little more bitter than the usual tea, but the mint and sugar ease the bitterness.

Sugar Cane Juice

Sugar Cane Juice

Sugar cane juice is exactly what it sounds like. You’ll find many juice shops all across Egypt that make this refreshing drink. The process is interesting; they put the sugar cane through a machine that crushes it using a metal mill, and the juice comes from the side.

Typically, the juice passes through a cone full of ice to cool it off and down into a large jug. They add extra ice in a plastic cup and pour the green goodness without any additions. Some add lemon juice to the drink, but it tastes perfect as it is.

Unfortunately, you won’t be able to make this one-of-a-kind juice at home. But you can find packed sugar cane juice at some grocery shops around the U.S. Make sure to drink it fresh out of the package.

Karkadeh

Karkadeh

Karkadeh is an iced Egyptian hibiscus tea. While you can make hibiscus tea using standard tea bags, the Egyptian one is slightly different.

That’s because locals use whole, dried hibiscus flowers. Those retain all their aroma and flavors, resulting in a sweet, strong drink unlike anything you’ve ever tried.

That’s not all. You don’t just pour hot water over the dried hibiscus and stir. Instead, you need to boil the flowers for around 15 minutes, ensuring all the aroma infuses into the tea.

During this step, add sugar to taste. After that, let the drink steep for around an hour. Finally, strain all the flowers, add ice, and enjoy a cup of refreshing karkadeh.

Sahlab

Sahlab

Sahlab is one of the most popular drinks in Cairo during the colder months. It’s as popular as hot chocolate in the West, and it’s just as heartwarming.

Although it looks similar to the Spanish horchata, it’s not the same thing. You can think of sahlab as a drinkable milk pudding with a variety of toppings. So, it’s heavy, creamy, and will warm you from the inside out.

Whether you’re looking for a unique drink to bundle around the fireplace or a hot beverage to serve at your next Christmas party, sahlab is for you. The best part is that sahlab couldn’t be simpler to make.

The base ingredients are milk and starch. You can even use coconut or almond milk if you’re vegan. Just add one teaspoon of cornstarch per cup of milk, sweeten to taste, simmer until the mixture thickens, and serve while hot.

The colder this drink gets, the harder it’ll be to drink, as it thickens with time.

Our favorite part about this recipe is the toppings. The sky is your limit with this one. We love adding toasted almonds, pistachios, and shredded coconut to our cup.

Dried fruits and raisins also make excellent additions. You can even make a sahlab topping station, so each member of your family can make their own unique cup.

Secret Recipe Tips

Secret Recipe Tips

Want to impress your guests and family with authentic Egyptian taste? Here are some secret recipes that’ll leave everyone wanting more:

  • Use fresh, seasonal vegetables: Egypt is blessed with an amazing array of vegetables. Even plain tomatoes taste better there. That’s mainly because they grow seasonal vegetables, which are more flavorful. So, if you want to make an Egyptian recipe, stay away from the frozen vegetable aisle.
  • Taste as you go: When making a new dish, you want to season it to your heart’s desire. After all, everyone has their own individual palate and unique preferences. So, give each element a taste while cooking to make sure everything is going according to your taste.
  • Season every element of the dish: Each part of the Egyptian dishes should shine on its own. If you’re making koshari, for example, it might be tempting to season the dish after it’s made. After all, this allows each guest to adjust the seasonings to their taste.

Season every element of the dish

  • End your meal with a cup of black tea: As per Egyptian traditions, drinking a hot cup of black tea after finishing your meal is a must. The potent tea is almost like a celebratory closing act for your big dinner.
  • Don’t be afraid to experiment: Every Egyptian household has its own variations on the classic recipes. And each one will claim to have the most delicious version. Well, this is a green light for you to experiment with your cooking, putting your unique spin on each dish and making it your own.

Popular Egyptian Ingredients

Popular Egyptian Ingredients

Want to stock up on some Egyptian dishes? Here are some popular ingredients you might need:

  1. Legumes: From ful and taamya to koshari, legumes are a main ingredient in various dishes.
  2. Vermicelli pasta: While it’s not a popular type of pasta in the West, Egypt loves adding vermicelli to many recipes.
  3. Ghee: Samna, or ghee, is a type of clarified butter, and it’s the secret behind Egypt’s most popular hearty dishes. It adds so many notes to any dish.
  4. Eggplant: You might be surprised by how much Egyptians love eggplant. They fry it, stuff it, smash it, and even make pickles out of it.

Herbs and Spices in Egypt

Herbs and Spices in Egypt

Besides the regular black pepper and dried chili that you find in almost any kitchen, there are some spices that Egyptians love using in their recipes. Here are the herbs and spices you need to stock up on:

  1. Cumin: This dried spice makes any dish much tastier, from ful to lentil soup.
  2. Coriander: Cilantro, or coriander, is an annual herb that Egyptians love and add to many recipes.
  3. Cardamom: Whether you’re making a savory or a sweet dish, cardamom can take it to the next level, and that’s why Egyptians love it.
  4. Cloves: Cloves are a staple in Egyptian cuisine. Not only that, but some love adding it to their tea.
  5. Mint: Starting to love black tea? Well, you need to try it with fresh mint.

Egyptian Food Culture

Egyptian Food Culture

So, how do Egyptians eat? Let’s dive into Egyptian eating habits and meal structure.

Eating Habits

Eating Habits

Egyptians are big foodies, so don’t be surprised by their heavy breakfast. After a big breakfast, they love to have a cup of black tea or a can of soda, and they’re ready to start their day. Between breakfast and lunch, a cup of Turkish coffee gets them through working hours.

After getting home from a long day at work, a hearty meal is the way to go. It’s typical for all family members to gather around the table for lunch.

Of course, another cup of tea helps them relax and unwind after a meal. It’s also a perfect time for some dessert or a fruit platter.

Meal Structure

Meal Structure

Most Egyptians start their day with a big plate of ful and some falafel along with pita bread. They also love having pickles and fried eggplant on the side.

As for lunch, cooked vegetables with chicken or meat and a side of rice are common. Of course, a plate of salata baladi is essential for any lunch.

If they didn’t have ful and falafel for breakfast, they’d definitely be having some for dinner. Otherwise, a platter of cheese or cold cuts along with pita bread is the way to go.

Etiquette

Etiquette

Dining etiquette in Egypt is similar to that in most Western countries. Using proper utensils is essential. However, locals eat certain meals by hand, like stuffed pigeons and fermented fish.

As for seating, the head of the table is reserved for the father or the host. Of course, the dining doesn’t start until the head of the dinner says it’s time to dig in.

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