Skip to main content

Jackie Dott-Mallory

Jackie Dott-Mallory auf Twitter.

Perfect Skillet Roasted Potatoes


Perfect Skillet Roasted Potatoes_

Have you ever had one of those "What Would You Want Your Last Meal To Be?" conversations?

I have. Partially because I’m a touch more morbid than most, and partially because I think about food nearly constantly. Also, between food writers, food bloggers and chefs, I hang out with quite a few food people and that tends to dictate the sway of conversation.

Julia Child ate French onion soup as her last meal. James Dean had apple pie and a glass of milk at a road side dinner. JFK ate a pretty typical breakfast of eggs, toast and coffee. John Lennon had a corned beef sandwich. Ernest Hemingway had a steak and potatoes.

(*have I totally creeped you out with death talk on my potatoes post?)

Really, what that conversation comes down to is what food could you not bear never eating again. For most people, that’s comfort food, or meals that remind them of childhood. To be honest with you, I can’t really decide on an answer to the super-morbid Last Meal question. But, I can tell you I would want potatoes to be a part of the meal.

I’ve been making these potatoes for a while. Really simple, easy and always turn out great, without much effort. They also just so happen to be vegan and gluten free, how great is that?

Last meal or not, I’ll be having these again soon.

Perfect Skillet Roasted Potatoes 3

Slow Cooker Stout Red Beans and Rice

Ingredients

  • 1 lb small red beans (or red kidney beans) dry
  • 24 ounces stout or porter
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1 hickory smoked ham hock
  • 1 red onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp sriracha
  • 1 tbs olive oil
  • 1 lb raw chicken bratwurst, sliced
  • 1 green pepper, chopped
  • 4 strips bacon, sliced
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • Cooked rice for serving.

Directions

  1. Add red beans, porter, chicken broth, ham hock, onion, garlic and sriracha to a slow cooker. Cook on low for eight hours.
  2. Once the beans are finished cooking, heat the olive oil in a sauce pan over medium high heat. Cook the brats, green peppers and bacon until meat has been cooked through. Stir the brats, bacon and peppers with the beans, salt and pepper to taste. serve over rice.
https://domesticfits.com/perfect-skillet-roasted-potatoes/

Perfect Skillet Roasted Potatoes 2

Beer and Buttermilk Fried Chicken

 

Beer and Buttermilk Fried ChickenP

 I’ve been wanting to make you some beer fried chicken for a while now, but it’s a bit intimidating.

The best fried chicken comes from the south, it’s a fact of sorts. As is the fact that, other than a few weeks in Atlanta, I haven’t spent much time in the Southern states. And, let’s be honest, a white girl from Washington State isn’t exactly your go-to when you want the worlds best fried chicken.

But I have some confidence in this recipes because it isn’t really mine. I’ve added a few things, but the heart and soul of it belongs to a woman who’s chicken was so incredible, Ruth Reichl spent weeks, and copious amounts of beer, extracting the recipe from her. Even 40 years after plying Claritha with enough beer to obtain said recpe, Ruth not only remembers it, she writes about it in Tender at the Bone: Growing Up at the Table.

Like any great recipe, it travels. How I hope my recipes become your recipes. My Chocolate Stout Cake becomes your Chocolate Stout Cake, the one your boyfriend begs you to make him for his birthday and tells his friends, "My girl makes the best cake." Because once your hands have cut the butter, stirred the batter and frosted the cake, it’s not my recipe any more, it’s yours. As it should be.

So, from Claritha, to Ruth to Random House to me and finally to you, is the best fried chicken I’ve ever made. I hope it becomes your fried chicken too.

Beer and Buttermilk Fried Chicken2

Beer and Buttermilk Fried Chicken

Adapted from Claritha's Fried Chicken, Ruth Reichl, Tender at the Bone

Ingredients

  • 3 lbs chicken drumsticks
  • 1 to 2 cups kosher salt
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 2 cups blonde ale
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne
  • 1/2 tsp fresh cracked black pepper
  • 2 tsp packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup vegetable shortening
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • Yield: 4servings

Directions

  1. Place chicken in a wide bowl. Cover with salt, place uncovered in the refrigerator for 2 hours. Remove chicken from the bowl.
  2. Rinse the chicken well and clean the bowl to remove all the salt. Add buttermilk, beer and onion slices to the bowl, stir to combine. Add the chicken back in the bowl, cover and refrigerate overnight, 8 to 20 hours.
  3. Add the flour, salt, cayenne, brown sugar, and pepper to a bag, shake to combine. Drain the chicken. add chicken to the bag, shake until the chicken is well coated. Place chicken on wax paper or parchment paper. Allow to sit at room temperature for 1/2 hour.
  4. In a large skillet melt the vegetable shortening and butter over high heat. Add chicken (working in batches if necessary), cover and lower heat to just above medium. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown, turn and cook on the opposite side for about 8 additional minutes or until cooked through.
https://domesticfits.com/beer-and-buttermilk-fried-chicken/

Beer and Buttermilk Fried Chicken3

 

Mirin Caramelized Brussels Sprouts

I’ve reached a goal of sorts, and I wanted to tell you about it. When I started this blog in 2011, it was as a direct response of having to put my 4 month old in the arms of stranger, turn around, and drive to an office.

Tater 6 months I love my job, and I love my babysitter, she has become a part of the family. But at the time, I didn’t know her, she was just the woman who had babysat my friends daughters. If you’ve never had to leave your baby,  it might not sound that terrible, but at the time it felt like a part of my heart was being torn out.

23479_393353146784_1986493_n

Every morning when I left her I cried, and my babysitter understood. She has four grown boys of her own, and started watching babies as a way to stay home with them, "I’d worry about you if this didn’t bother you. It’s OK, everyone cries when they leave their babies," She had told me. Somehow, that made me feel better.

I decided to try and find a way to work part time, in order to stay home with her more and maybe, when I decided to have Baby #2, I would be able to stay home longer. For some reason, a blog was my brilliant idea. It wasn’t until after I had fallen in love with blogging that I discovered that the average blogger only makes $40 a month. Although I am lucky enough to make much more than that off my ad revenue, it isn’t enough to quit my job. Even though the income isn’t what I hope, my complete love and utter obsession with food writing, blogging and recipe develop makes up for that. But I needed other ways to make money. Little by little, small job by small job, I’ve been able to nickel and dime my way to part time.

I’m part time!

I only have to go to an office 3 days a week. It really is amazing. One of the ways I’ve been able to do this is freelance writing. I wrote an article last year for Honest Cooking that I was so proud of, I just have to tell you about it. More than 100 food writers and bloggers pitched for only 10 slots in the new Honest Cooking iPad magazine and I was given one of those spots. I was so grateful, but once I got the green light, I froze. Could I do it? Could I really write something I was proud of, that could stand up to the work of real life food writers? Writing this article I was able to prove to myself that I am able to do this. It was a turning point for me, proof that I really can do this. I can move forward in this world I so badly want to be part of. And next time, maybe I wont have to put my infant in the arms of a stranger.

The article I pitched was on a non-profit that I’m a bit starry eyed over. Homeboy industries helps Los Angeles gang members get out of gangs by turning them into chefs and bakers. It’s an incredible organization and for so many people, the only way out of gang life. It is the most successful gang rehabilitation program in the world.

Homeboy3

I spent three days interviewing ex-con, ex-gang members, visiting "urban gardens" spread across East Los Angeles, farmers markets and Homeboy Cafes. I left so inspired, by the people, their stories and the fight they fight daily to pull themselves out of the gangs they were often born into and give themselves and their children a good life.

Homeboy11

So, please, if you have an iPad, please download the app and read my article. It’s a free app full of great food related articles and inspiring stories.

honest cooking

I also have some Brussels sprouts for you! I love these vegetables, but so far, my husband isn’t a fan. I’ve tried so many methods, braising, bacon fan, roasting and yet he remains unimpressed. Until I poured some Mirin  into a cast iron skillet. It gets a bit sweet and caramelized, giving a new life to there little green guys.

He loved these, more than even the bacon fat version. I hope you do too.

Mirin Brussels Sprouts

Beer and Buttermilk Fried Chicken

Adapted from Claritha's Fried Chicken, Ruth Reichl, Tender at the Bone

Ingredients

  • 3 lbs chicken drumsticks
  • 1 to 2 cups kosher salt
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 2 cups blonde ale
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne
  • 1/2 tsp fresh cracked black pepper
  • 2 tsp packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup vegetable shortening
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • Yield: 4servings

Directions

  1. Place chicken in a wide bowl. Cover with salt, place uncovered in the refrigerator for 2 hours. Remove chicken from the bowl.
  2. Rinse the chicken well and clean the bowl to remove all the salt. Add buttermilk, beer and onion slices to the bowl, stir to combine. Add the chicken back in the bowl, cover and refrigerate overnight, 8 to 20 hours.
  3. Add the flour, salt, cayenne, brown sugar, and pepper to a bag, shake to combine. Drain the chicken. add chicken to the bag, shake until the chicken is well coated. Place chicken on wax paper or parchment paper. Allow to sit at room temperature for 1/2 hour.
  4. In a large skillet melt the vegetable shortening and butter over high heat. Add chicken (working in batches if necessary), cover and lower heat to just above medium. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until golden brown, turn and cook on the opposite side for about 8 additional minutes or until cooked through.
https://domesticfits.com/mirin-caramelized-brussels-sprouts/

Mirin Brussels Sprouts3

Vegan Chipotle Stout Chili with IPA Cashew Cream

 

Vegan Chipotle Stout Chili With Cashew Cream

 

If you’re new to the Craft Beer scene, it might surprise you how many vegetarian and vegans there are here.

While I am a meat eater (clearly, I put bacon in desserts), I did spend three years as a vegetarian. Mostly, this was a response to growing up on a farm and getting up close and personal to the butchering process as well as the jarring realization of knowing the first name of my dinner. It did, however, give me a profound respect for the food I eat and the farms that share that respect.

I still eat vegan quite often, and there are some dishes, like lasagna, that I just think are just better in vegetarian form.

My true and honest feeling about vegan cooking is that regardless of what your typical diet is if you can’t cook a vegan meal that you love, you just aren’t that good of a cook. Produce is amazing, you get to use all the grains, seeds and nuts that you want and by the way, for the most part beer is vegan.

I first heard about Cashew Cream from this guy, and the idea was intriguing, given that I would have a much easier time giving up meat than sour cream and goat cheese. I like the idea of having a creamy element when I want to go non-dairy. This cashew cream was a really beautiful creamy addition to a vegan chili, when sour cream isn’t an option. I wanted to balance the sweetness so I added some acid and some spices, but feel free to experiment. This would also be a great place to add a little chipotle.

Vegan Chipotle Stout Chili With Cashew Cream2

 

Vegan Chipotle Stout Chili with IPA Cashew Cream

Ingredients

    For The Cashew Cream:
  • 2 cups raw cashwes,
  • 1 to 1 ½ cups almond milk
  • Additional 1/3 cup almond milk
  • 2 tbs IPA beer
  • ½ tsp onion powder
  • ½ tsp garlic
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 2 tsp white wine vinegar
  • For The Chili:
  • 3 tbs olive oil
  • 1 white onion, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 cup crimini mushrooms, finley diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 12 wt ounces Soyrizo
  • 2 cup stout
  • 2 cups veggie broth
  • ¼ cup tomato paste
  • 1 (15 oz) can of black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (15 oz) can of kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (15 oz) can stewed diced tomatoes, with juice
  • 1 or 2 large chipotle peppers in adoboe, minced
  • ½ cup quinoa
  • 1/3 cup bulgur wheat
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • ¼ tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • Garnishes:
  • ½ cup Cilantro, chopped
  • 1 Avocado, sliced
  • Tortilla Chips

Directions

  1. Add the cashews to a bowl, pour almond milk over cashews until covered. Let stand for 4 hours.
  2. Drain cashews and add to a food processor with 1/3 cup almond milk, IPA, salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder and vinegar. Process until smooth, about 5 minutes, possibly longer. Add additional almond milk or beer for a thinner consistency.
  3. In a pot over medium high heat, add the olive oil, onions, red peppers and mushrooms. Cook until onions and peppers have softened and the mushrooms have darkened.
  4. Add the garlic and the soyrizo, stir, breaking up the soyrizo.
  5. Add the stout, broth, tomato paste, black beans, kidney beans, tomatoes and chipotle, allow to simmer for about 10 minutes.
  6. Add the quinoa, bulgur, cumin, smoked paprika, salt and garlic powder, simmer until the quinoa has cooked, about 15 minutes. The longer chili simmers, the thicker it will be.
  7. Plate on top of tortilla chips, if desired, top with cilantro, avocado, and cashew cream.
https://domesticfits.com/vegan-chipotle-stout-chili-with-ipa-cashew-cream/

Negative Calorie Roasted Asparagus and Cauliflower Soup

 

Negative Calorie Roasted Asparagus and Cauliflower Soup

I heard this theory of negative calories foods about a year ago. And while this idea would be a dream come true, I’m not actually convinced of it’s validity.

The theory is that some food cost your body more energy in calories to consume and digest than the food actually contains.

Take celery for instance. A stock of celery is 5 calories, but between chewing, swallowing and digesting, it takes 15 calories to actually eat a  stalk of celery, for a net loss of 10 calories. Now, if celery could just taste better, and not like, well, celery, than we’d be all set. Clearly, this theory doesn’t apply to French fries.

On the list of "Negative Calorie Foods" are:

-Asparagus

-Beet Root

-Broccoli

-Cabbage

-Carrot

-Cauliflower

-Celery

-Chicory

-Hot Chili

-Cucumber

-Watercress

-Garlic

-Green Beans

-Lettuce

-Onion

-Radish

-Spinach

-Turnip

-Zucchini

-Apple

-Blueberries

-Cantaloupe

-Cranberry

-Grapefruit

-Honeydew

-Lemon/Lime

-Mango

-Orange

-Papaya

-Peach

-Pineapple

-Raspberry

-Strawberry

-Tomato

-Tangerine

-Turnip

-Watermelon

 

While this theory has been widely discredited, there is no arguing with the fact that this is an incredible list of foods. If more than half of your diet was pulled from the above list, and the rest of your diet was "sensible" you would never have to diet again and those skinny jeans would be yours.

I did a bit of a test of my own. I made a batch of this soup and ate it for lunch every day for a week.

I lost 2 lbs. Which is a lot for me, given that I have a BMI of 20.6.

That doesn’t really prove anything. Other than the fact that a low calorie vegan soup is a good route to take when looking to drop those holiday pounds. Believe the theory or not, this is still a fantastic list of healthy foods.

Even if this soup isn’t "Negative Calorie," it still only has 78 calories per serving.

 

Vegan Chipotle Stout Chili with IPA Cashew Cream

Ingredients

    For The Cashew Cream:
  • 2 cups raw cashwes,
  • 1 to 1 ½ cups almond milk
  • Additional 1/3 cup almond milk
  • 2 tbs IPA beer
  • ½ tsp onion powder
  • ½ tsp garlic
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 2 tsp white wine vinegar
  • For The Chili:
  • 3 tbs olive oil
  • 1 white onion, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 cup crimini mushrooms, finley diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 12 wt ounces Soyrizo
  • 2 cup stout
  • 2 cups veggie broth
  • ¼ cup tomato paste
  • 1 (15 oz) can of black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (15 oz) can of kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (15 oz) can stewed diced tomatoes, with juice
  • 1 or 2 large chipotle peppers in adoboe, minced
  • ½ cup quinoa
  • 1/3 cup bulgur wheat
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • ¼ tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • Garnishes:
  • ½ cup Cilantro, chopped
  • 1 Avocado, sliced
  • Tortilla Chips

Directions

  1. Add the cashews to a bowl, pour almond milk over cashews until covered. Let stand for 4 hours.
  2. Drain cashews and add to a food processor with 1/3 cup almond milk, IPA, salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder and vinegar. Process until smooth, about 5 minutes, possibly longer. Add additional almond milk or beer for a thinner consistency.
  3. In a pot over medium high heat, add the olive oil, onions, red peppers and mushrooms. Cook until onions and peppers have softened and the mushrooms have darkened.
  4. Add the garlic and the soyrizo, stir, breaking up the soyrizo.
  5. Add the stout, broth, tomato paste, black beans, kidney beans, tomatoes and chipotle, allow to simmer for about 10 minutes.
  6. Add the quinoa, bulgur, cumin, smoked paprika, salt and garlic powder, simmer until the quinoa has cooked, about 15 minutes. The longer chili simmers, the thicker it will be.
  7. Plate on top of tortilla chips, if desired, top with cilantro, avocado, and cashew cream.
https://domesticfits.com/negative-calorie-roasted-asparagus-and-cauliflower-soup/

Negative Calorie Roasted Asparagus and Cauliflower Soup

Pasta Cavatelli: Homemade Pasta Without A Pasta Roller

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Machine

I love hearing other peoples Culinary Bucket Lists. It’s always a really interesting mix of classic recipes, mastering techniques, and difficult dishes. I love that, it shows range.

But seriously people, start crossing some of this stuff off. You can do it. Just jump right in, and do it.

This is a great recipe for everyone that has "Make Pasta From Scratch" on your list because you don’t need any fancy equiptment. Just some flour, water and a knife.

You’ve go this.

I’m going to be honest with you, this is a bit labor intensive. But you can finally draw that satisfying line though the item that’s been taunting you on your bucket list for years. You can finally say things like, "This one time, while I was making pasta from scratch…" and "Well, when I make my pasta…"

It’ll be fun.

Homemade Cavatelli Pasta

2 cups All Purpose flour

1 cup Semolina flour

½ tsp salt

1 cup warm water

 

1. Add both kinds of flour and salt to a flat surface, mix to combine.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller

2. Make a well in the middle and add the water.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller2

3. Stir the liquid and the flour together until combined. Then knead until smooth, about 5 minutes.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller3

4. Cut into 4 pieces, wrap in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller4

5. One at at time, take a piece of dough and form into a long log about 1/4 to 1/2 inch in diameter.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller5 How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller6

6. Cut off about 1/4 inch slice and place in front of you. It should be about the size of a dime.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller7

 

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller8

7. Place a bench knife (I use this one, I love it), or the dull side of a butter knife, on the far side of the dough circle, pull towards you smearing the dough against the counter. The dough should curl up over the knife.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller9

8. It should look like a little canoe.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller10

10. Place on a baking sheet that has been lightly dusted with flour until ready to use. Basically, if you mound them on top of each other, they’ll stick.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller11

11. Cook immediately in lightly salted water until al dente or allow to dry and store in an air tight container.

How To Make Pasta Without A Pasta Roller12

 

 

Look at you, you homemade pasta maker.

I’m so impressed with your mad skills.

 

 

Stout Soaked Cherry Cheesecake with Pretzel Crust

Stout Soaked Cherry Cheesecake Bars with Pretzel Crust P

I need your help.

I’m somewhere around halfway done with this cookbook, and I need some feedback. I have about 50 recipes ready to go, but they have never been cooked outside of my kitchen.

I want to know if they work for you, if you like them (or didn’t), if the directions make sense. This part is important to me, it increases the chances that we can catch some of the flaws, some of the directions that may be misleading, or some factor I might have overlooked.

This book means so much to me, and the recipes working for as many people as possible is a high priority.

And I can’t do this on my own. If you are willing to make one (or more) of the Top Secret recipes I have in the works, keep it secret until the book goes to print, and give me your honest opinion, I need that.

If you’re at all interested, Please, check out my Book Page for more info. Please.

 

Stout Soaked Cherry Cheesecake with Pretzel Crust

Ingredients

  • 8oz sweetened dried cherries (about 1 ½ cups)
  • 2 cups stout
  • 3 cups mini pretzels twists, lightly crushed (about 1 ½ cups once processed)
  • 2 tbs brown sugar
  • ½ cup melted butter
  • 24 ounces cream cheese
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • pinch salt
  • 2 tbs flour
  • 1 ½ cups granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp vanilla

Directions

  1. Place dried cherries in a bowl or tall glass. Pour stout over cherries until fully submerged. Allow to sit at room temperature for 1 to 2 hours. Drain, reserving ¼ cup of the soaking liquid.
  2. Preheat oven to 400.
  3. In a food processor, add the pretzels and brown sugar, process until only crumbs remain, about 3 to 5 minutes. Slowly add the melted butter while the processor is running. Pour into the bottom of a 9 X 13 inch baking pan. Use the flat bottom of a heavy glass, measuring cup or mug to press the crust really well into a flat even layer.
  4. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add the cream cheese, beat on high until creamy, about 3 minutes. Add the sour cream and beat until well combined. Add the salt, flour and sugar, mix until well incorporated. Add the eggs and vanilla, one at a time, mixing well between additions. Add ¼ of the stout used to soak the cherries, mixing until just incorporated. Stir in the cherries.
  5. Pour cream cheese mixture over the crust, smooth out into an even layer.
  6. Place in the oven and reduce oven temp to 350. Bake at 350 for 28-32 minutes or until the cheesecake has puffed slightly and center no longer jiggles when you shake the rack it sits on. Don’t over bake, it will firm up once it chills. Remove from oven (allow to stand at room temp until slightly cooled, about 10 minutes) refrigerate until chilled and set, at least 4 hours and up to 24. Cut into squares for serving
https://domesticfits.com/stout-soaked-cherry-cheesecake-with-pretzel-crust/

 

 Stout Soaked Cherry Cheesecake Bars with Pretzel Crust2

 

 

 

Avocado Alfredo Pasta with Spicy Shrimp

Avocado Alfredo Pasta with Spicy Shrimp P

Apparently, I like to torture myself.

Sometimes it’s in small ways, like keeping my size zero jeans from my modeling days that I will never fit into again. Ever. Ever.

Sometimes it’s by spending hours looking at photos, like these, that are so good I know I will never be able to grace the world with images that perfect.

Lately, because I’m about knee-deep  in the cookbook I’m writing, the stress of my rapidly approaching deadline has somehow convinced me that I need to read Amazon cookbook reviews. The bad ones. Always the bad one.

And it terrifies me. Although, it should makes me feel better. If people can find ridiculous faults with gorgeous cookbooks, I have no chance of pleasing everyone, and that will put me in good company. The company of every other person who has ever written a book of any kind.

Although I did learn something: People Suck.

-One lady left a nasty 1-star  review on a cookbook she didn’t own and  had never even seen in real life because she hated the POSITIVE reviews. What the hell?

-Several people left angry 1-star reviews because the cookbook in question had too many "hard" recipes.

-One lady left an irate review about a cookbook called "Savory Pies" because it wasn’t a dessert cookbook. SAVORY!!

-One guy left a 1-star review of a cookbook because he didn’t think the color of the cover went well with his kitchen.

-One lady left a bad review because the author said, "too many common sense things" Apparently the absurd and irrational cookbook wasn’t available for Kindle.

 

So, I have no chance. I can’t please everyone, that just needs to be a fact that is accepted. Like how it rains in Los Angeles from time to time, or that you will have to replace the tires on your car at some point.

I wish I was OK with this idea that someone will inevitably pay money for my book and hate it, but it happens to keep me up at night.

I worry that someone will try to make the Stout Chocolate Cake with Raspberry Porter Ganache and confuse weight ounces with fluid ounces and blame me when her husbands birthday cake doesn’t work. (BTW, whomever decided that two completely separate units of measurement, that have nothing to do with each other, should have the same name, is an A-Hole.)

I even worry that someone who can’t drink alcohol will leave me a nasty review about my Cooking with Beer book about how he can’t make any of the recipe, due to the fact that they ALL contain beer.

Instead of looking away from the train wreck of the ignorant spewing hatred at other people’s hard work, I stress ate pasta.

It was great, and even my Avocado averse husband loved it.

Avocado Alfredo Pasta with Spicy Shrimp2

 

Stout Soaked Cherry Cheesecake with Pretzel Crust

Ingredients

  • 8oz sweetened dried cherries (about 1 ½ cups)
  • 2 cups stout
  • 3 cups mini pretzels twists, lightly crushed (about 1 ½ cups once processed)
  • 2 tbs brown sugar
  • ½ cup melted butter
  • 24 ounces cream cheese
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • pinch salt
  • 2 tbs flour
  • 1 ½ cups granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp vanilla

Directions

  1. Place dried cherries in a bowl or tall glass. Pour stout over cherries until fully submerged. Allow to sit at room temperature for 1 to 2 hours. Drain, reserving ¼ cup of the soaking liquid.
  2. Preheat oven to 400.
  3. In a food processor, add the pretzels and brown sugar, process until only crumbs remain, about 3 to 5 minutes. Slowly add the melted butter while the processor is running. Pour into the bottom of a 9 X 13 inch baking pan. Use the flat bottom of a heavy glass, measuring cup or mug to press the crust really well into a flat even layer.
  4. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add the cream cheese, beat on high until creamy, about 3 minutes. Add the sour cream and beat until well combined. Add the salt, flour and sugar, mix until well incorporated. Add the eggs and vanilla, one at a time, mixing well between additions. Add ¼ of the stout used to soak the cherries, mixing until just incorporated. Stir in the cherries.
  5. Pour cream cheese mixture over the crust, smooth out into an even layer.
  6. Place in the oven and reduce oven temp to 350. Bake at 350 for 28-32 minutes or until the cheesecake has puffed slightly and center no longer jiggles when you shake the rack it sits on. Don’t over bake, it will firm up once it chills. Remove from oven (allow to stand at room temp until slightly cooled, about 10 minutes) refrigerate until chilled and set, at least 4 hours and up to 24. Cut into squares for serving
https://domesticfits.com/avocado-alfredo-pasta-with-spicy-shrimp/

Avocado Alfredo Pasta with Spicy Shrimp5

Buffalo Chicken Beer Cheese Dip

Buffalo Chicken Beer Cheese Dip4 @TheBeeroness

This needs to be made with an IPA.

The buffalo sauce (which has to be Franks, let’s just get that out of the way) needs a big kick to the face. The only beer up for that job is an IPA.

I made this with Ballast Point’s Sculpin, one of my favorite IPA’s on the planet, and as with so many great IPA’s, it’s made in California.

After all, we have Ballast Point’s SculpinRussian River’s PlinyBear Republic’s Racer 5Stone’s RuinationDrake’s Aroma Coma, and AleSmith IPA.

No offense to the rest of the world, but if you love your hops, the West Coast is a great place to be.
Buffalo Chicken Beer Cheese Dip @TheBeeroness

But maybe you don’t like hops. The mere thought making you want to wash your mouth out with a pale lager.

Before you decide, definitively, I dare you to have a blind IPA taste party.

Get a bottle of every beer on the above list (this will be much easier for my West Coast friends), pour them, taste them.

And don’t forget to invite me. I’ll bring the dip.

Buffalo Chicken Beer Cheese Dip via @TheBeeroness

Buffalo Chicken Beer Cheese Dip

Yield: 4-6 servings

Ingredients

  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 3 boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into small pieces
  • 8 oz sour cream
  • 16 oz cream cheese, softened
  • 3/4 cup Parmesan
  • 3/4 cup Mozzarella, plus ½ cup mozzarella for top
  • 1/3 cup Franks Red Hot Sauce
  • 2/3 cup IPA beer
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 tbs cornstarch
  • ½ cup blue cheese crumbles

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large pan over medium high heat, add the chicken and cook until browned, about 5 minutes.
  3. In a food processor, add the sour cream, cream cheese, Parmesan, 3/4 cup mozzarella, Franks Red Hot, beer, garlic powder and cornstarch, process until well combined, about 5 minutes.
  4. Pour into an oven safe dish. Stir in chicken pieces, sprinkle with remaining mozzarella.
  5. Bake until warm and cheese is bubbly, about 15 minutes.
  6. Remove from oven, sprinkle with blue cheese and serve warm with chips.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by Yummly Rich Recipes
https://domesticfits.com/buffalo-chicken-beer-cheese-dip/

 

Join me: FacebookTwitter

Beer Cornbread Topped Chicken Pot Pie

Happy 2013.

Anyone broken their New Years Resolutions yet?

I love resolutions, I just don’t make those "I’m going to remove things I love from my life" kind.

I make resolutions that are more inline with goals. As in:

-I’m going to take a homemade pasta class

-I’m going to read more food lit

-I’m going to explore vegan cooking, because produce is amazing

Someday I’ll set the "I’m going to start homebrewing this year" resolution, but I’m not there yet.

Beer Cornbread Topped Chicken Pot Pie2

It’s possible that were you live, it’s actually cold right now. And maybe you set a resolution about cooking more often, if that’s the case, I have the perfect thing for you.

Chicken pot pie, with cornbread build right in. Oh, and some beer.

Beer Cornbread Topped Chicken Pot Pie

Ingredients

    Filling:
  • 4 ears of corn
  • 2 tbs butter, plus 2 tbs, divided
  • 1 large shallot, chopped
  • 2 large carrot, peeled and sliced into rings
  • 1 cup peas
  • 2 ribs of celery, chopped
  • 2 tbs oil
  • 4 boneless skinless chicken thighs, chopped into bite sized pieces
  • 3 tbs flour
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 4 sage leaves, minced (about ½ tsp)
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • (1/3 more, plus more chicken)
  • Cornbread top:
  • 3/4 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 1 tbs baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • ½ cup beer (pilsner or low to medium hopped pale ale)
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 tbs melted butter
  • Yield: 6 servings

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. Cut the corn off the ears, set aside.
  3. In a large pot, melt 2 tbs butter. Add the shallots and cook until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the carrots, peas, and celery, cook until the vegetables have soften about an additional 5 minutes. Remove from pot, set aside.
  4. Heat the olive oil. Add the chicken, cook until browned on all sides, about 5 minutes, remove chicken from pot.
  5. Add remaining 2 tbs butter, heat until melted. Spinkle flour on top, whisk until well combined. Add the chicken broth and bring to a low simmer. Return the chicken and vegetables to the pot along with the corn, allow to simmer for about 10 minutes.
  6. Place 6 individual, oven safe bowls (about 1 ½ cup sized) on a baking sheet. Pour chicken soup into bowls until about 2/3 full.
  7. Ina large bowl, add the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, salt and stir until combined. Make a well in the dry ingredients, add the beer, egg and melted butter. Stir until just combined.
  8. Top the bowls with cornbread mixture (it’s OK if the batter sinks, it’ll rise during baking).
  9. Bake at 400 for 20 minutes or until cornbread is golden brown.
https://domesticfits.com/beer-cornbread-topped-chicken-pot-pie/

 

 Beer Cornbread Topped Chicken Pot Pie3

Scallops On Smoked Sweet Corn Puree With Stout Balsamic Glaze & My Year According To Instagram

2012, according to Instagram

2012 instagram2

1. Drinks with Greg of Sippity Sup after the Herbavoiracious Book Release Party

2. Sharing a beer sampler with Jessica of How Sweet It Is during a break from BlogHer Food Conference in Seattle

3. Road trip to Big Bear with my gorgeous friend Linda, of Salty Seattle

4. The road trip with Linda was for the wedding or Matty, and Andrew of Eating Rules, amazing ceremony.

5. Chillin' on the field of Dodger Stadium with Andre Ethier. No biggie.

6. A much needed vacation to Santa Barbara with my amazing little family.

7. My first cooking segment! On CBS news in Los Angeles

8. Winner, Winner Chicken Dinner! I won the  Foster Farms regional cook-off in San Diego.

9. Trip to San Francisco and Napa valley for the Foster Farms National Cook off Finals. I didn’t win, but I did get an amazing weekend trip to San Francisco and Napa Valley, the opportunity to cook at the CIA, and some cash out of the deal. Not bad.

10. I signed my first book deal! with Adams Media.

11. How amazing is my husband? Seriously.

12. Feast of the Seven Fishes at the home of Greg of Sippity Sup. With Joy The Baker, Kristin of The Cuisnerd, and The AMAZING Table Set Guys, Nathan, Andy & Greg.

13. Joy and I had a couple of drinks. And then picked up sharp knives. She made a salad, and I mostly just giggled.

14. Christmas Eve at The Dresden a long running tradition. Although most people just know it as "That Place They Filmed The Movie Swingers" It’s a Los Angeles  landmark.

15. I rearrange my entire living room to take pictures. Of food. During my lunch break.

16. I gave my daughter a trampoline for Christmas and she doesn’t want to get out of it. Ever

 

Scallops smoked sweet corn puree stout balsamic glaze

I had such an incredible year, truly a year that was blessed by the blogging community and those who have supported me, the online friendships that turned to lasting ones and the connections we feel through food.

One of the my favorite events this year was The Feast of the Seven Fishes, a small dinner party and Fancy Schmancy Pot Luck thrown by Greg and Alaska SeaFood (see numbers 12 &13 above). A truly incredible night, hoisted up by the stellar seafood, an epic example of how essential it is to buy the good stuff when cooking a meal from the sea. Alaska Seafood is focused on providing the world with incredible, sustainable, wild seafood and were they gracious enough to provide each of the seven cooks who participated with the best Alaska has to offer.

feast seven fishes

(Photo: Andy Windak)

The results were outstanding. Some of the most incredible food I’d had all year.

Check out this amazing video of the evening put together by Andy.

Here is the progression of the Feast of The Seven Fishes dinner:

Hors d’oeuvre: Kritisn, Grilled Blue Star Oysters

Amuse Bouche: Nathan, Rye Crisp with Maple Cream, Rye Beer-Marinated Salmon Roe, Green Chile Sugar and Fennel Top

Frist Course: Me! Seared Sea Scallops with Smoked Sweet Corn Puree & Stout Balsamic Glaze (recipe below)

Soup Course: Brian, Seared Ponzu Halibut with Forbidden Rice

Third Course: Andy, Uni Capellini with Scallop, Bonito and Nori Crumble, Rye Toast with Pine Nut Porcini Butter

Fourth Course: Joy made this Crab, Apple & Pomegranate Salad

Dessert: Greg Caffè e Frittelle Dolci

 

Seared Scallops Smoked Sweet Corn Puree And Stout Balsamic Reduction

There are two ways to buy scallops, "wet" and "dry." A wet scallop with be soaked in a phosphate solution to preserve it. This makes it taste soapy and gives it a bit of a rubbery texture, but the vast majority of scallops sold in US markets are wet. Dry scallops are more expensive, harder to come by and infinitely tastier.

If you can’t find dry scallops, the best way to treat a wet scallops is a quick brine.

Here is my quick brine recipe that works wonders to get those phosphates out of your tasty seafood.

If you can find some dry Alaskan scallops, I highly recommend that you grab them.

Also, I used this smoker. It’s less than $50 and stores in your cabinet, perfect for me and my occasional smoking needs.

 

Buffalo Chicken Beer Cheese Dip

Ingredients

  • 2 tbs olive oil
  • 3 boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into small pieces
  • 8 oz sour cream
  • 16 oz cream cheese, softened
  • 3/4 cup Parmesan
  • 3/4 cup Mozzarella, plus ½ cup mozzarella for top
  • 1/3 cup Franks Red Hot Sauce
  • 2/3 cup IPA beer
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 2 tbs cornstarch
  • ½ cup blue cheese crumbles

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350
  2. Heat the olive oil in a large pan over medium high heat, add the chicken and cook until browned, about 5 minutes.
  3. In a food processor, add the sour cream, cream cheese, Parmesan, 3/4 cup mozzarella, Franks Red Hot, beer, garlic powder and cornstarch, process until well combined, about 5 minutes.
  4. Pour into an oven safe dish. Stir in chicken pieces, sprinkle with remaining mozzarella.
  5. Bake until warm and cheese is bubbly, about 15 minutes.
  6. Remove from oven, sprinkle with blue cheese and serve warm with chips.
https://domesticfits.com/scallops-smoked-sweet-corn-puree-stout-balsami/

I remade this recipe on my other blog, The Beeroness with an explanation of the brining process, check it out here.

 

Stout Hot Chocolate with Stout Whipped Cream

Stout-Hot-Chocolate_2

I was interviewed by a baking magazine a few weeks ago, because apparently I am the foremost expert on cooking with beer. This was the second interview I’ve done on the subject for a print magazine. One question always gets asked, so I figure some of you might have this same question:

"Does the alcohol cook off? Is it safe for kids?"

The short answer is: yes. The long answer, it depends.

Stout Hot Chocolate 4

Let me explain. No matter how much you cook beer, or any alcohol for that matter, some trace amounts remain. So trace, that their effects will never be felt, nor will the alcohol enter your blood stream. The USDA deems the consumption of cooked alcohol safe for all ages as well as pregnant women, you can see evidence of this when you are able to order steak in a red wine sauce or a rum raisin cake without being carded.

In order for the beer to be cooked enough to remove the alcohol it must be cooked at 170 (or above) for at least 10 minutes. This isn’t much. Everything that is baked will meet these requirements. Pan fried items generally will also meet the requirements, and although beer battered items aren’t cooked for ten minutes, the heat is so high and the amount of alcohol so small (about 1tbs per serving) the amount of alcohol actually left behind is minimal.

Because of this, I see no health concerns with the consumption of cooked beer. The only concerns that I do have are moral. I cook often, and have a diverse group of friends, among them are people who have moral conflicts with alcohol, such as Mormons and people in recovery. I would strongly suggest that if you are cooking for others, let people who may be morally opposed to consuming alcohol know what they are about to be served. Someone in AA might be triggered by the taste of beer, and some religions condemn the consumption of alcohol in all forms, even trace amounts.

Wow, not that thats out of the way, I have a Stout Hot Chocolate for you. And with your newly acquired beer cooking knowledge you have full control over how boozy you make it.

Head over to Rachel Cooks for the recipe.

Stout Hot Chocolate 5

Creamy Vegan Broccoli Avocado Soup & Five Foodie New Years Resolutions

Creamy Vegan Broccoli Soup

Five New Year Food Resolutions to Make

 

Let’s stop vowing to cut things out of our lives at then beginning of each year, and start promising ourselves we’ll add some great things in.

Can’t we all just agree that those “I’m going to lose weight/stop eating sugar/give up carbs/cut out coffee” resolutions are just going to leave us feeling hungry, guilty and eventually shameful when they go enormously ignored about the second week in January?

Maybe you have a bigger capacity for restraint than I do, or a higher guilt threshold, but I gave up those types of personal promises years ago. Although I do still love a good resolution and tend to make them year round.

How about we agree to ADD things to our lives instead of taking away? There is something about making a decision to add something great to our world that just reminds us what an amazing life we have ahead of us. And adding greatness has a way of pushing out some of those not as great things.

Let’s give it a try.

Here are my favorite food resolutions, all about adding more amazingness, not about taking things away.

 

1.Start a food tradition: Maybe a once a month Sunday Supper with your family, or a quarterly Food Friends Pot Luck, or even just New Recipe Wednesday where you try a new dish. Food traditions are memories that you’ll be glad you made.

2. Read more food lit. Chefs have written most of the best books I’ve read over the past year. There is something about knowing the back story of food, and those who have created it, that give you a deeper connection to the food world.  Plus, food people tend to read food books, it’s an instant conversation starter when you meet a food writer or a chef. My recommendations: Yes Chef, Marcus Samuelson;  Blood, Bones & Butter, Gabrielle Hamilton; Tender at the Bone: Growing Up at the Table,  Ruth Reichl, Kitchen Confidential, Anthony Bourdain.

3. Join a CSA or other Organic Produce Delivery Program. Before my recent move, I got a box of organic produce delivered to my doorstep every Wednesday from Love Delivery. Mostly local, in season and very fresh fruits and vegetables. This also gets you to eat more good stuff, because it’s there. And you hate to waste it.  Supporting local farmers and eating healthier, it’s a total win. There are several in most cities and states, consult Google for ones in your area.

4. Try New Foods. This is for the picky eaters. Pick one new food a month and cook it, and eat it. Or, order that one thing on the menu that you would never normally eat. After a year you’ll have 12 foods that you never otherwise would have tried. And I’m going to bet you a batch of cookies that you will be surprised at how much you like at least one of those new foods.

5. Master A Recipe or Technique. Maybe you’ve always wanted to learn to make a soufflé, or homemade pasta. What better resolution to make than the acquisition of culinary knowledge you can someday pass down to future generations? Just go into assuming that the first time may not be a huge success, and by that I mean don’t plan an entire dinner party around skills you haven’t acquired just to end up in tears when your husband has to have pizza delivered. It will probably go fine, and you will probably post the results on Facebook (yay!), but take it slow and know that to master a technique takes a lot of practice, each time you try it you’ll learn something new.

 

One of my resolutions is to explore vegan cooking more, even though I have no plans to give up meat or dairy. There really isn’t any arguing with the fact that produce is the best thing you can put in your body. The more I focus on the beautiful flavors of fruits and vegetables, without using meat and dairy as a crutch, the better my cooking becomes over all.

Here is a vegan soup, inspired by this Bon Appetite recipe. Without garnishes, it’s about 170 calories a serving.

Here is a How To Roast Red Peppers post by Kitchen Treaty. If you are going to use them right away, you can skip the oil and the jar.

Creamy Vegan Broccoli Soup2

Beer Cornbread Topped Chicken Pot Pie

Ingredients

    Filling:
  • 4 ears of corn
  • 2 tbs butter, plus 2 tbs, divided
  • 1 large shallot, chopped
  • 2 large carrot, peeled and sliced into rings
  • 1 cup peas
  • 2 ribs of celery, chopped
  • 2 tbs oil
  • 4 boneless skinless chicken thighs, chopped into bite sized pieces
  • 3 tbs flour
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 4 sage leaves, minced (about ½ tsp)
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • (1/3 more, plus more chicken)
  • Cornbread top:
  • 3/4 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 1 tbs baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • ½ cup beer (pilsner or low to medium hopped pale ale)
  • 1 large egg
  • 3 tbs melted butter
  • Yield: 6 servings

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400.
  2. Cut the corn off the ears, set aside.
  3. In a large pot, melt 2 tbs butter. Add the shallots and cook until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the carrots, peas, and celery, cook until the vegetables have soften about an additional 5 minutes. Remove from pot, set aside.
  4. Heat the olive oil. Add the chicken, cook until browned on all sides, about 5 minutes, remove chicken from pot.
  5. Add remaining 2 tbs butter, heat until melted. Spinkle flour on top, whisk until well combined. Add the chicken broth and bring to a low simmer. Return the chicken and vegetables to the pot along with the corn, allow to simmer for about 10 minutes.
  6. Place 6 individual, oven safe bowls (about 1 ½ cup sized) on a baking sheet. Pour chicken soup into bowls until about 2/3 full.
  7. Ina large bowl, add the cornmeal, flour, baking powder, salt and stir until combined. Make a well in the dry ingredients, add the beer, egg and melted butter. Stir until just combined.
  8. Top the bowls with cornbread mixture (it’s OK if the batter sinks, it’ll rise during baking).
  9. Bake at 400 for 20 minutes or until cornbread is golden brown.
https://domesticfits.com/creamy-vegan-broccoli-avocado-soup-five-foodie-new-years-resolutions/

 

If you want to know how I made the garnishes "float" on top of the soup for the picture, check this out.

Creamy Vegan Broccoli Soup3

Ham And Beer Cheese Sandwiches

Your Holiday Ham leftovers don’t stand a chance.

Smothered in delicious beer cheese and served on a leftover dinner roll.


Ham and Beer Cheese Sandwich3

And don’t be afraid if your previous beer cheese ventures haven’t gone so well. This one is foolproof, I promise. I’ve cracked the beer cheese code. Mostly for selfish reasons. Regardless of the reason behind the failure, I hate when my recipes don’t work for you. And beer cheese, since the dawn of time, has always been difficult. Except this one. It also takes about 5 minutes, and it will work.

Ham and Beer Cheese Sandwich

1 batch Foolproof Beer Cheese

2 tbs melted butter

8 Kaiser rolls (or leftover dinner rolls)

about 2 lbs ham, sliced

1 cup arugula

2 large tomatoes, sliced (or, sliced cherry tomatoes)

Split buns or rolls, brush with melted butter. Toast lightly under a broiler or in a toaster oven.

Add ham, top with generous amounts of beer cheese sauce, and then with arugula and tomatoes.

Ham and Beer Cheese Sandwich3

Caramel Apple Galette with Champagne Whipped Cream

 

Caramel Apple Galette With Champagne Whipped Cream2p

I made three Galettes in the past week. This one, one I’m working for the cookbook I’m writing and a small caramelized onion and cheddar one that got devoured.

These are like a secret weapon, in a way. The crust (which you absolutely MUST be made from scratch) is one of my favorite recipes I’ve ever made. It’s soft and buttery and flakey and takes about 8 minutes to throw together.

Caramel Apple Galette With Champagne Whipped Cream7

Eight minutes and you have yourself the best homemade crust you have ever tasted. It does need at least an hour to chill, but the best part is that you can make it days ahead of time and it’s all ready to go when you need it. You can even double the recipe and freeze the extra in a ziplock freezer bag for up to a month.

It’s rustic and it’s imperfections just make it that much more charming.

It has that perfect balance of foodie without fussy and casually elegant. Perfect.

Caramel Apple Galette With Champagne Whipped Cream6

And with Champagne Whipped cream (for real!!) it’s perfect for New Years.

Oh, and I found out last year how to pronounce Galette. I really wanted to say Guh-Lay, because it sounded more elegant to me. I was wrong, I’ll put my linguist aspirations on hold. It’s pronounced Gal-Let. Either way, it’s delicious.

Caramel Apple Galette With Champagne Whipped Cream3

Brown Ale And Cheddar Grits With Pancetta And Crispy Sage

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups whole milk
  • ¾ cups brown ale
  • 1 cup regular corn grits (not instant)
  • 1 cup smoked cheddar
  • ½ cup whole milk
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • pinch cayenne
  • 3 tbs butter, diced
  • 3 oz diced pancetta
  • 5 Sage leaves, chopped (about 2 tbs)

Directions

  1. Add the milk and beer to a large pot, bring to a gently simmer, slowly whisk in the grits. Allow to simmer gently, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 20 minutes.
  2. Slowly whisk in the cheese, milk, salt, pepper, onion powder and butter, stir until completely combined.
  3. In a separate pan add the pancetta and cook until browned and most of the fat has been rendered, do not burn. Add the sage and cook for about 30 seconds or until crispy. Drain.
  4. Serve grits topped with pancetta and sage.
https://domesticfits.com/caramel-apple-galette-with-champagne-whipped-cream/

Caramel Apple Galette With Champagne Whipped Cream4

Brown Ale And Cheddar Grits With Pancetta And Crispy Sage

I like homebrewers. Mostly because they give me beer, but also because there is this fascination with flavors and a "What Would This Taste Like?!" attitude that is at the core of every food bloggers culinary soul. I feel like they get me. They have an understanding of why I write down crazy ideas, unexplored flavor combinations that may be doomed to fail, just to see if it can be done.

I’m not a homebrewer, its actually a little intimidating to me. Someday, when my life is a little less hectic, I want to take the Mash Tun Plunge. But for now, I’ll setting for drinking the concoctions of others. I did learn recently that the more recent rise in popularity of brown ales has been credited to the massive increase in homebrewing and the popularity of the style with the homebrewer. I’d never though of it, but it seems to be true. Most of the brown ale I’ve had in the past few months has come from someones closet. I do love a great brown ale, to drink with as well as to add to my cheese grits. I guess saving the Brown Ale from extinction is another reason I can love the homebrewer.

Brown Ale And Cheddar Grits

 

Brown Ale And Cheddar Grits With Pancetta And Crispy Sage

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups whole milk
  • ¾ cups brown ale
  • 1 cup regular corn grits (not instant)
  • 1 cup smoked cheddar
  • ½ cup whole milk
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • pinch cayenne
  • 3 tbs butter, diced
  • 3 oz diced pancetta
  • 5 Sage leaves, chopped (about 2 tbs)

Directions

  1. Add the milk and beer to a large pot, bring to a gently simmer, slowly whisk in the grits. Allow to simmer gently, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 20 minutes.
  2. Slowly whisk in the cheese, milk, salt, pepper, onion powder and butter, stir until completely combined.
  3. In a separate pan add the pancetta and cook until browned and most of the fat has been rendered, do not burn. Add the sage and cook for about 30 seconds or until crispy. Drain.
  4. Serve grits topped with pancetta and sage.
https://domesticfits.com/brown-ale-and-cheddar-grits-with-pancetta-and-crispy-sage/

Brown Ale And Cheddar Grits4

How To: Make Goat Cheese & A Food Photo Tip

 

Let’s skip right to the photography tip, shall we? I’m pretty excited about it.

See this dish of homemade goat cheese, it’s a little less than full:

Homemade Goat Cheese

The best "filler" for a partially filled bowl is a potato. For several reasons.

First, they’re cheap and you probably already have them.

Homemade Goat Cheese3

Second, they can be cut any shape you need. And re-cut if necessary. They also lift out of the bowl cleanly (unlike a paper towel I’ve seen recommended).

Third, they don’t float if you need to use them in a bowl of soup.

Homemade Goat Cheese4

Just place your potato at the bottom of the bowl, fill and you are ready to shoot.

Homemade Goat Cheese5

See, it looks full. You’d never guess it was chocked full of Idaho’s finest.

Homemade Goat Cheese6

This is also a GREAT way to make sure that the soup garnishes "float" on top of the soup bowl. I tried an upside down ramekin for the below shot, but it kept floating, and it was too tall, and since I (obviously) wasn’t able to cut it to shape, I had to overfill the bowl.

Which I later spilled when I went to move it from photo land, to eating land.

Butternut Bisque pomegranate Goat Cheese

 But the idea was good. And the next time I went to shoot some soup, I decided to use a potato cut to shape, and fancied myself a genius. Look how the good stuff just "magically" floats on top. Patiently waiting for it’s photo to be taken.

Chicken-Enchilada-Soup4P

 

So. You might not have a complete obsession with photographing food. You might just be here for the recipe. I guess we can talk about that, It turns out making your own goat cheese is really easy, and really good.

SO easy, in fact, that you should try it, it’s almost fail safe.

If you’ve made ricotta (you totally should), you pretty much have already made the cow version of goat cheese, the process is the same.

Homemade Goat Cheese7

 

Hey, look how full that bowl is.

Foolproof Beer Cheese Sauce

Ingredients

  • 2 tbs Butter, softened (or melted)
  • 2 tbs Flour
  • 1 tbs Cornstarch
  • 1 cup beer (wheat beer, blonde ale, pale ale, pilsner)
  • 1 cup shredded Gouda, do not use pre shredded
  • 1 cup shredded Cheddar, do not use pre shredded
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Add all ingredients to a blender or food processor. Process on high until very well blended, about 5-8 minutes.
  2. Transfer contents to a saucepan over medium high heat. Whisk rapidly and continuously until thickened, about 5 minutes.
  3. Salt and pepper to taste.
  4. If small bits of cheese solids remain, blend until smooth with a hand blender.
  5. Serve warm.
https://domesticfits.com/how-to-make-goat-cheese-a-food-photo-tip/

 

 

 

Foolproof Beer Cheese Sauce

To be honest, this post is one hundred percent selfish.

Since the shooting Friday, I haven’t been able to stop watching the news or reading every bit of online news about the recent tragedy. Therefore, the tears are pretty much a mainstay in my life.

 Foolproof-Beer-Cheese-SauceP

And in my emotionally fragile state, I can’t handle a beer cheese failure and we could all use even a small win.

Let’s be honest, beer cheese can be a bitch. It’s a pretty standard fondue, but it has about a 50% fail rate (*this is a completely made up statistic based solely on conjecture & observation) and I didn’t want to deal with a mess if the Beer Cheese Gods were otherwise occupied.

 Foolproof Beer Cheese Sauce2

Look back on my blender epiphany that brought us the Roast Garlic and Parmesan Beer Cheese Dip and the epic win that it is, I wanted to see if it also extended it’s foolproof graces to beer cheese sauce.

Foolproof Beer Cheese Sauce4

It does. Blend the crap out of it and it won’t have a choice but to work. This takes the guesswork, and the fear of failure, out of making a lovely little cheese sauce for all to enjoy.

 Foolproof Beer Cheese Sauce3

And don’t forget the cornstarch, it’s not yummy, I wouldn’t ask you to add it if it wasn’t important. Also, pre-shredded cheese has additives that hinder it’s ability to re-melt, so don’t use it.

 

Foolproof Beer Cheese Sauce

Yield: 2 1/2 cups

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons Butter, softened (or melted)
  • 2 tablespoons Flour
  • 1 tablespoons Cornstarch
  • 1 cup beer (wheat beer, blonde ale, pale ale, pilsner)
  • 1 cup shredded Gouda, do not use pre shredded
  • 1 cup shredded Cheddar, do not use pre shredded
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • salt and pepper

Instructions

  1. Add all ingredients to a blender or food processor. Process on high until very well blended, about 5-8 minutes.
  2. Transfer contents to a saucepan over medium high heat. Whisk rapidly and continuously until thickened, about 5 minutes.
  3. Salt and pepper to taste.
  4. If small bits of cheese solids remain, blend until smooth with a hand blender.
  5. Serve warm.
Schema/Recipe SEO Data Markup by Yummly Rich Recipes
https://domesticfits.com/foolproof-beer-cheese-sauce/